Notes – The Snowball, By Alice Schroeder: Part II, Chap. 5-19

The following are reading notes for The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life, by Alice Schroeder. This post covers Part II: The Inner Scorecard, Chap. 5-19

The beginning of Buffett

In a letter to a family member from one of Warren Buffett’s ancestors, Zebulon, the elder Buffett counsels his grandson to

be content with moderate gains

almost as if some strain of value investing ethic permeated his lineage from before Buffett himself had even heard of The Intelligent Investor. Buffett’s family represents a long line of business minded people. Yet, despite this heritage,

Buffett always credited most of his success to luck

It’s an odd, likely guilt-laden existential belief to carry around with oneself! But it is maybe no surprise. Love doesn’t sound like it was given much attention in Buffett’s childhood home, and self-love is probably included, as we learn that:

Politics, money and philosophy were acceptable topics for dinner-table discussion at the Buffett house, but feelings were not. Nobody in the Buffett household said “I love you,” and nobody tucked the children into bed with a kiss.

Any guess as to where some of Buffett’s later self-hating charitable giving ideas might have come from?

[Buffett’s mother, Leila’s] favorite stories told of her and Howard’s sacrifices… anything for Howard. “She crucified herself”… But Leila’s attitude of duty and sacrifice had another, darker side: blame and shame.

If you guessed his psychotic, clinically depressed mother, you answered correctly!

It is Buffett’s relationship to his mother and his vulnerability to her rage as a child that we actually see Buffett in the most sympathetic light. We see as Warren recounts his relationship with his mother this grown, aged man “weeping helplessly”, and we also learn that despite the savage treatment from his mother, which his idolized father was aware of, Howard “didn’t intervene.”

The most vulnerable people in any society are children– they’re physically, intellectually AND emotionally unequipped to make sense of and thoughtfully respond to the irrationalities and volatilities of unstable and violent adults. It is actually quite touching imagining this young, budding genius, Warren Buffett, suffering at the hands of his psychologically diseased mother and developing a precarious existential belief system that leaves him feeling so guilty for the remainder of his life that after all he has (legitimately) achieved, he is still convinced it was mostly due to luck! What an absolute tragedy of human imagination! It would be nice to imagine the poor, hurting and timid child inside of Warren Buffett eventually being freed to go on his way and let Warren wrestle with these childhood demons no more.

What a different world it would be if Warren was a hero entrepreneur rather than a man so tormented by his past that he carries his fears and anxieties into his public persona and recommendations for society at large!

We also see in this information the source of Warren’s fascination with other people’s mothers (who he often developed crushes on), with motherly women in general and with his tendency to have a cadre of close female friends in both his personal and professional life, all while simultaneously having a troubled and distant relationship with his own wife and children later on. What a sad development for an otherwise triumphant individual.

The search for a system – Buffett the handicapper

One of the central themes of Part II is the young Warren Buffett’s search for a “system”: a predictable, confined process for predicting and handicapping the odds of various events in his life. Starting with his bathtub marble race, extending to the racing track (horses) and eventually culminating in his quest for an investment system (part of his initial attraction to Graham, who was especially formulaic, scientific and systematic in his approach to the investment question in general).

And a system, once found, is only valuable if it has a lot of information to process:

There were opportunities to calculate odds everywhere. The key was to collect information, as much information as you could find.

We also begin to see hints of the later, “original” Buffett, with his love of monopoly as a competitive advantage. The anecdotes of Buffett and his friend Russ collecting license plate information in the hopes of eventually providing it to the police to catch a bank robber are examples of Buffett’s early obsession with  the value of a monopoly. Similarly, while the young Warren was holed up in a hospital with an illness, he took to collecting the fingerprints of the nurses so that if one of them committed a crime,

he, Warren Buffett, would own the clues to the culprit’s identity

This is a pretty astounding conclusion for a young child to reach, even if it is innocently done. It appears Warren had something of an intuitive understanding of the value of a restricted supply granted by a monopoly on a particular resource.

He also was perplexed by the way so much valuable information (valuable to someone with a system in place for interpreting and analyzing it) went uncollected and unused. An early example is Buffett’s collecting of bottle caps nearby soda dispensers:

The numbers told him which soft drinks were most popular

Do you see the future investor in Coca-Cola beginning to formulate his understanding of the value of consumer habits and patterns?

In the 1940s, Buffett started visiting horse racing tracks where he learned

The art of handicapping is based on information. The key was having more information than the other guy

Buffett ended up reading HUNDREDS of books on horse handicapping before he eventually learned the Rules of the Racetrack:

  • Nobody ever goes home after the first race
  • You don’t have to make it back the way you lost it

Buffett later connected these experiences to his investing and understood

The market is a racetrack too. The less sophisticated the track, the better… the trick, of course, is to be in a group where practically no one is analytical and you have a lot of data

In this way, a handicapper or investor can develop informational asymmetries which grant him the all-important edge. Interestingly, Buffett earned a college scholarship in just this way, as he was the only person to show up to a scholarship committee session and thus earned the scholarship by default because he had no competition.

This is where the quote about Buffett sifting through the Moody’s Manuals company by company, page by page (all ten thousand) comes from, and the famous quote,

I actually looked at every business– although I didn’t look very hard at some

In a similar vein, Warren’s classmates at the Columbia Business School completely ignored the opportunity they had, right in front of them, to learn investing from the premier guru of their era, Benjamin Graham. Instead,

They were a remarkably homogeneous group of men, mostly headed to General Motors, IBM or U.S. Steel after they got their degrees

These young men were being trained to become managers. Meanwhile, Buffett was training to become an owner (and he would later own IBM, while the other two American stalwarts died slow, painful deaths). Or, as Buffett later put it,

U.S. Steel was a good business… it was a big business, but they weren’t thinking about what kind of train they were getting on

Buffett also learned the importance of “swinging at the right pitches”:

You’re not supposed to bet every race. I’d committed the worst sin, which is that you get behind and you think you’ve got to break even that day

Simultaneously, Buffett was realizing the importance of thinking for oneself and not being a mindless trend follower. Granted an opportunity to play “the echo” to another trumpeter in the school band, Buffett found himself in a confusing and embarrassing situation in which the lead player played the wrong note and Warren didn’t know what to do as his “echo”. The lesson?

It might seem easier to go through life as the echo– but only until the other guy plays a wrong note

He also became enamored with Dale Carnegie and his social system, one of the most important lessons of which he felt was “Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.”

In addition, Buffett studied the biographies of great businessmen such as:

  • Jay Cooke
  • Daniel Drew
  • Jim Fisk
  • Cornelius Vanderbilt
  • Jay Gould
  • John D. Rockefeller
  • Andrew Carnegie

looking for the keys to their “system”.

History repeats itself, or at least rhymes

In Part II we also get a glimpse into the way that early themes and experiences in Buffett’s life replayed themselves as important investments in his later life as the world’s best known and must successful investor. For example:

  • as a child, Buffett sold chewing gum door-to-door; he later successfully invested in Wrigley’s chewing gum
  • as a child, Buffett collected soda bottle caps; he later successfully invested in Coca-Cola
  • as a child, Buffett was obsessed with model trains and always dreamed of owning a train set; he later successfully invested in Burlington Northern railroads
  • as a child, Buffett met Sidney Weinberg, an important figure at Goldman Sachs, during a field trip to Wall St with his father; he later successfully invested in Goldman Sachs
  • as a child, Buffett had a paper route in which he distributed, amongst many other papers, the Washington Post; he later successfully invested in the Washington Post and other dailies

Warren catches the wealth-bug

It was on his trip to the Stock Exchange in New York City in 1940 with his father that Warren first understood the money-making potential of stock investing. Witnessing exchange members who had servants roll custom cigars, Warren realized

the Stock Exchange must pour forth streams of money… he worked with a passion for the future he saw ahead of him, right there in sight. He wanted money

Later, Warren came across a book entitled “One Thousand Ways to Make $1,000” or, in Warren’s mind, how to make a million dollars. This was it. He was going to be a millionaire. The book had hopeful, helpful and optimistic advice that we would all well consider and pay attention to in the event that we become similarly motivated:

the opportunities of yesterday are as nothing compared with the opportunities that await the courageous, resourceful man of today! You cannot possibly succeed until you start. The way to begin making money is to begin… Hundreds of thousands of people in this country who would like to make a lot of money are not making it because they are waiting for this, that or the other to happen

Buffett also learned around this time the power of compounding and decided

If a dollar today was going to be worth ten some years from now, then in his mind the two were the same

Early Buffett investments, and why he made them

Before he had even graduated from college, the young Warren Buffett had made a number of stock and private investments:

  • Cities Service Preferred; bought three shares at $114.75 for himself and his sister, the shares fell and then recovered; Buffett sold at $40/share for a $5 profit, only to watch the shares rise to $202, lessons learned:
    • Do not overly fixate on the price paid for a stock
    • Don’t rush unthinkingly to grab a small profit; it can take years to earn back the profit “lost” through opportunity cost
    • Buffett didn’t want to have responsibility for other people’s money unless he was sure he could succeed
  • Around age 15, Warren had invested in “Builders Supply Co.”, a hardware store owned and operated by his father and his father’s business partner, Carl Falk, in Omaha
  • Around age 15, Warren bought a 40-acre farm for $1,200 that he split the profits of with a tenant farmer; he sold it when he was in college (5 years later) for $2,400
  • Buffett invested “sweat equity” in a paper route which earned him $175/mo in an era when a grown man felt well-paid on $3,000/yr
  • Buffett started a used golf-ball retailing business with a friend, selling golf balls for $6/dozen, through a wholesaler in Chicago named Witek
  • Buffett bought a pinball machine for $25, placed it in a barbershop and recouped $4 in the first day; he went on to purchase 7-8 pinball machines for “Mr. Wilson’s pinball machine company”, learning the principle of capital,  money that works for its owner, as if it had a job of its own
  • 1949, Buffett shorts automaker Kaiser-Frazer, which went from producing 1/20 cars to 1/100 in the market; Buffett saw a trend in the statistics
  • Preparing to enter Columbia, Buffett invested in Parkersburg Rig & Reel, purchasing 200 shares after discovering the company “according to Graham’s rules” in The Intelligent Investor
  • At Columbia, Buffett was invested in Tyer Rubber Company, Sargent & Co. and Marshell-Wells (a hardware company) of which he had jointly purchased 25 shares with his father; Marshell-Wells was the largest hardware wholesaler in the US and traded for $200 but earned $62/share, making it similar to a bond with a 31% yield
  • After visiting with Lou Simpson at GEICO, Buffett dumped 3/4ths of his stock portfolio to buy 350 shares of GEICO, which was trading at 8x current earnings at $42/share and was rapidly growing; Buffett felt his margin of safety was a growing, small company in a large field meaning it had a lot of opportunity ahead of it, especially because it was the lowest cost provider
  • Grief Bros. Cooperage, a barrel maker and Ben Graham stock
  • Philadelphia Reading Coal & Iron Company, selling for $19/share with $8/share worth of culm banks
  • Cleveland Worsted Mills, textile manufacturer selling for less than its current assets of $146/share; the company cut the dividend which was part of Buffett’s investment thesis and he sold the stock in disgust
  • A gas service station, which he bought with a friend for $2,000; the property never made money as they couldn’t entice customers from the nearby Texaco station; Buffett lost his investment and learned the value of customer habit

Related to the theme of early Buffett investments is the course of the young Buffett’s savings and the accumulation of his capital stock:

  • Age 14, his savings totaled around $1,000, “he was ahead of the game… getting ahead of the game, he knew, was the way to the goal”
  • Age 15, his savings totaled around $2,000, much of which was from his newspaper route
  • Age 16, his savings totaled around $5,000 ($53,000 in 2007 dollars), much of it from his pinball and golfball businesses
  • Age 20 (1950), his savings totaled $9,803.70 which was partly invested in stocks, as well as a $500 scholarship and $2,000 from his father for not smoking
  • Age 21, his savings totaled $19,738, he had boosted his capital 75% in a single year and he felt “supremely confident in his own investing abilities”, he also was willing to take on debt equal to a quarter of his net worth, or about $5,000, for total capital of around $25,000

Miscellaneous Buffett lessons

On betting and deal-making in general:

Know what the deal is in advance

What Buffett learned from Graham:

  • A stock is the right to own a little piece of a business
  • Use a margin of safety so the effects of good decisions are not wiped out by errors; the way to advance is to not retreat
  • Mr. Market is your servant, not your master
On influence:

it pays to hang around people better than you are, because you will float upward a little bit. And if you hang around with people that behave worse than you, pretty soon you’ll start sliding down the pole

Buffett’s authorship of the article “The Stock I Like Best” on GEICO attracted the attention of a later financial backer, Bill Rosenwald, son of Julius Rosenwald and longtime chairman of Sears, Roebuck & Co.

Notes – The Snowball, By Alice Schroeder: Part I, Chap. 1-4

The following are reading notes for The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life, by Alice Schroeder. This post covers Part I: The Bubble, Chap. 1-4

Why Warren Buffett is driven to make money

The first chapter of The Snowball opens with the author interviewing Buffett in his office at Kiewit Plaza. She asks,

Where did it come from, Warren? Caring so much about making money?

Interestingly, Buffett’s response is something of a non-sequitur:

Balzac said that behind every great fortune lies a crime. That’s not true at Berkshire.

Are we supposed to believe this means Buffett is ultimately a moralizer? That he’s driven to make money just to show it can be done in an honest fashion? If so, where does THAT come from? You see, Buffett didn’t answer the question posed to him.

We also learn that Buffett reads voraciously, and that he watches CNBC (on mute, just to get the scroll of news stories and market developments). Every good investor knows CNBC is a bunch of noise, it is not edifying and it is distracting. It’s peculiar that a long-term oriented, value investor like Buffett would make CNBC part of his daily routine.

Buffett travels to Sun Valley, Idaho, July 1999

We begin to see Buffett as a completely self-absorbed individual. As he travels with a contingent of his family (children and grandchildren) to the Allen & Co. “elephant-bumping” retreat in Sun Valley, the man never looks out the window of his G4 and

He sat reading, hidden behind his newspapers, as if he were alone in his study at home

where, apparently, he treats his significant other, Astrid Meeks, in similar fashion, as noted in a later chapter which depicts Astrid as something of a live-in hamburger-making, Coke-delivering otherwise-invisible person who tries not to disturb the Great Warren during his nightly routine of hours of online bridge and conversations with his insurance lieutenant, Ajit Jain, at 10PM at night. Everyone’s entitled to their flaws and interpersonal relationships seem to be one of Buffett’s.

Which is interesting, because he goes to great pains in Sun Valley to be liked by everyone. Buffett

liked few things more than getting a free golf shirt from a friend [Allen & Co.’s president and organizer of the outing]

and he

went out of his way not to be disliked by anyone

Somewhat peculiar juxtaposed social relationships for a man who waxes philosophical about the Inner Scorecard versus Outer Scorecard in life, one being a measure of self as seen by self, the other being a measure of self as seen by others. You’d think neglecting your family while making pains to impress social acquaintances would register on the Inner Scorecard, but no matter.

This isn’t a Beat Up Buffett blog– the man has a lot to teach and I have a lot to learn. I just find these items odd as I read.

The festivities in Idaho are noteworthy because of what an extremely above-average experience it is for the people involved when compared to daily existence for the Average American, let alone the Average Human Being. To wit, after “white water river rafting” down a stream lined with ambulances and quick response teams for safety (and, one might imagine, helicopter gunships for security),

the guests were handed warm towels as soon as they put down their paddles and stepped out of the rafts, then served plates of barbecue

In addition,

Reporters were banned [from covering the outing]… [the various money managers in attendance represented] more than a trillion dollars [in combined wealth under management]

This is unusual company, an elite group within society, wittingly or not. There is nothing wrong with this level of affluence, it’s simply worth mentioning to set Buffett’s life into context– he’s not of us, at least not at this point in his career.

The key scene at Sun Valley is Buffett’s economic-prediction-as-financial-market-lesson-speech in which he lectures the newly minted tech bubble millionaire crowd on economic cycles and sound investing. A few notes:

  • Most people treat stocks like chips in a casino; Buffett sees the chips represent ownership in businesses (entities that create more chips over time)
  • Technology is not a guaranteed win for investors; history is replete with new technologies that made huge improvements in everyone’s standard of living, yet few had made investors rich (ie, the automobile, and the 3,000 original manufacturers that had over time combined into 3 major firms in the US; airline industry, $0 made in the aggregate stock investments in the industry’s lifetime)
  • Valuing is not the same as predicting
  • What you’re doing when you invest is deferring consumption and laying money out now to get more money back at a later time. And there are really only two questions. One is how much you’re going to get back, and the other is when.
  • As interest rates vary, the value of all financial assets change
  • Three ways the stock market can grow faster than the economy:
    • interest rates fall and remain below historic levels
    • share of the economy going to investors as opposed to employees, government, etc., remains above historic levels
    • the economy grows faster than normal
  • Book value: the amount of money that had been put into the business and left there
  • Ultimately, the value of the stock market can only reflect the output of the economy; on average, the return of the stock market is about 6% a year

Buffett also makes reference to “Lord Keynes”; not that it’s a big secret, but I don’t know anyone who isn’t a Keynesian who refers to Keynes that way (with prestige and respect for the State-granted honorific). If it wasn’t obvious otherwise, I’d say this is evidence enough of Buffett being a Keynesian.

Buffett also lives by the rule, “Praise by name, criticize by category.” That’s very Dale Carnegie-esque.

Enter the Munger

In Part I, we’re also introduced to Buffett’s curmudgeonly friend and business partner, Charlie Munger.

Munger is a graduate of Harvard Law School. He also

admired [Benjamin] Franklin for espousing Protestant bourgeois values while living as he damn well pleased

We also learn a curious fact about Munger’s charitable practice, which

took the form of a Darwinian quest to boost the brightest

but often took the form of “noblesse oblige” because he attached many strings to his giving which were “for the recipients own good, because he knew best” (Schroeder’s articulation). Munger and Buffett are famous for their hands-off, passive management approach to their acquired businesses; yet when it comes to charity, Munger is a world-saver who tries to micro-manage things to an almost tyrannical degree. It seems like a mismatch, but, when combined with his love of Franklin’s philosophical pragmatism and his background at Harvard, it fits the egotistical elitist mold quite well.

Munger, like Buffett, reads a great deal, tearing through newspapers and periodicals everywhere he goes. And Munger, like Buffett, seems quite impressed with his father– Munger carries his father’s old briefcase and vacations at his father’s old Minnesota cabin, while Buffett has a shrine-like portrait of his father in his office and claims he’s “never seen anybody quite like him.”

Revisiting the theme of “Why does Buffett watch CNBC?”, Buffett is subscribed to several newsletters about stocks and bonds and he reads the daily, weekly and monthly operating reports of the Berkshire subsidiary companies. For someone with a long-term orientation, it seems puzzling he would be fascinated or concerned with this kind of contemporaneous minutiae, but perhaps his is simply a mind that thrives on volumes of data to create patterns, impressions and meaning.

Finally, when we learn about Buffett’s two scorecards, we also learn that Buffett pays “close attention” to the rankings of the world’s wealthiest people. This standing would appear to reside on the Outer Scorecard which Buffett warns against measuring one’s life against.

Video – Rahul Saraogi On Value Investing In India

The Manual of Ideas presents Rahul Saraogi, managing director of Atyant Capital Advisors

Major take-aways from the interview:

  • Referring to Klarman, finding ideas and doing the analysis is a small part of investing; the two most critical factors to succes in any investment as a minority shareholder are corporate governance and capital allocation
  • Good corporate governance means a dominant shareholder who treats minority shareholders like an equal business partner: even aside from egregious fraud and legal violations, you can face situations where dominant shareholders use the company like a piggy bank or to promote personal agendas
  • Once you’ve cleared the corporate governance hurdle you must consider capital allocation: many times companies follow the same strategy that got them from 0 to a few hundred million in market cap, which will not work to get them to the next level; often by this time the dominant shareholder is sufficiently wealthy and loses interest in capital allocation to the detriment of minority shareholders
  • India’s investment universe:
    • Indian GDP close to $2T
    • Indian market cap $1.5-2T
    • 80-85% of India’s market cap is represented by the top 150 firms: mega-cap banks, steel producers, etc., that trade on ADRs and everyone knows of outside of India
    • Thousands of listed companies below this with market caps ranging from $2-3B to a couple million dollars
    • Rahul finds the next 1200-1300 companies below the top 150, with market caps ranging from $50M-$2B, to be the most interesting opportunity
  • Corporate governance is binary: either a company gets it, or it doesn’t
  • Case study: 1998, invested in a sugar manufacturer trading for $20M generating $20M in annual earnings with a 14% tax free dividend yield, virtually debt free, strong moats, dominant player in its field, grew from $20M to $900M market cap, the owners were very focused on growing capital, no grandiose desire to build empires, not trying to grow the top line at all costs or gain rankings, just allocating capital wisely
  • Every investor is looking for shortcuts and binary decisions, ie, “Should I invest in India or not invest in India?”; the reality is it’s a lot of work, it’s about turning over as many stones as you can– what Buffett has done well is finding people who can compound capital and then staying with them through market cycles
  • You can do what Buffett did in any market but you must dive into it, get your hands dirty, do the work it takes and then maintain the discipline to stick with what you’ve found
  • Home-market bias: most people are going to allocate most of their capital in their home-market, because by definition anything that is not familiar or proximate is considered risky; consequentially, “locals” will disproportionately benefit from economic and financial gains in their local markets
  • India can not and likely will not become a dominant allocation in a foreign investors portfolio; without devoting 100% of your time and energy to understanding that market, or having someone invest on your behalf who does, you will likely not understand the culture, motivation and habits of the people in that market
  • “It is imperative that in any market you go with people who understand it and are focused on it full time because investing is ultimately bottom-up”
  • Accounting, financial reporting and investor relations practices are modeled off the US and UK so they’re similar; however, many businesses are run by one or two entrepreneurs and they’re often too busy to be available to speak with outside investors, but persistence pays off when they realize you’re interested in learning about their business
  • Access to capital in Indian markets has improved, meaning it has become easier for Indian companies to scale
  • Why does India have high rates of capital compounding? India is a 5,000 year old civilization and has had borrowing, lending and private markets for capital that entire time meaning people are aware of capital compounding; that being said, India has companies and management that understand ROC, those that don’t, and those that are essentially professional Ponzi-schemes, issuing capital at every market peak and then trading for less than the issued capital at the trough because they’re constantly destroying wealth
  • Rahul sees the government as incapable of providing the public infrastructure needed by the growing economy; he sees the economy turning toward a “private-public partnership” model that is more private than public– enlightened fascism?
  • As companies rushed into this private-public space, a lot of conglomeration and corporate mission-creep occurred, resulting in systemically low ROC for companies in the infrastructure space as most as poorly run; failure of top-down investing thesis
  • “I’m looking for confirmation in facts, not in other investors’ opinions”
  • I can comment on whether valuations for individual companies make sense, but I can’t make a judgment on the value of a broad market index, I just don’t think that number means anything
  • Risk management: develop assumptions about the company’s business and then periodically analyze what the company is doing relative to original investment hypothesis; if your assumptions prove to be wrong or something changes drastically with the company, that is when you hit a “fundamental stop-loss” and corrective action needs to be taken immediately, even if the stock has done well and the price has risen

Notes – The Intelligent Investor Commentary By Jason Zweig

The Intelligent Investor: A Book of Practical Counsel

by Benjamin Graham, Jason Zweig, published 1949, 2003

The Modern Day Intelligent Investor

The following note outline was rescued from my personal document archive. The outline consists of a summary of the end-chapter commentary written by Jason Zweig. Zweig did such a good job of reviewing Graham’s lessons in each chapter and practically applying them that I find you can get most of the major principles of The Intelligent Investor by reading the combined commentary chapters as if they were a standalone investment book.

Of course, Graham’s original work is a classic in the value investing tradition and it should be read and savored on its own, as well.

Chapter 1, JZ commentary

  1. What is investing?
    1. You must thoroughly analyze a company, and the soundness of its underlying businesses, before you buy its stock
    2. You must deliberately protect yourself against serious losses
    3. You must aspire to “adequate”, not extraordinary, performance
  2. How to invest
    1. An investor calculates what a stock is worth, based on the value of the underlying business
    2. A speculator gambles that a stock will go up in price because somebody will pay even more for it
    3. You should be comfortable owning the underlying business even if you couldn’t get timely, regular quotes of its market price
    4. Price is what the business is selling for, not what it’s worth. Value is what the business is worth. Money is sometimes made in the arbitraging of the two, but price does not dictate value; in the long-term, value dictates price
  3. Limit your risk
    1. Never mingle speculative accounts and investment accounts
    2. Never allow your speculative thinking to spill over into your investing activities
    3. Never put more than 10% of your assets into your “mad money” account

Chapter 2, JZ commentary

  1. Stocks have not had a perfect record of keeping up with inflation, as measured by the CPI
  2. 20% of the 5year periods from 50s today in which inflation dominated saw falling stocks
  3. Two strategies for branching out beyond stocks during inflation:
    1. REITs (Real Estate Investment Trusts)
    2. TIPS (Treasury Inflation Protected Securities)
      1. IRS considers an increase in TIPS value to be taxable income

Chapter 3, JZ commentary

  1. “By the rule of opposites, the more enthusiastic investors become about the stock market in the long run, the more certain they are to be proved wrong in the short run.”
  2. The stock market’s performance depends on three factors:
    1. real growth in earnings and dividends
    2. inflation(-expectations) within the general economy
    3. speculative appetite for stocks/risk (increase/decrease)
  3. In the long run, you can reasonably expect stocks to average a 6% nominal return, 4% real return (with inflation calculated at 2% historical rate)
  4. Be humble about your ability to forecast future stock returns– don’t risk too much on a forecast that could turn out to be wrong.

Chapter 4, JZ commentary

  1. Two kinds of intelligent investors:
    1. active/enterprising – continual research, selection and monitoring of a dynamic mix of stocks, bonds or mutual funds (intellectually/physically demanding)
    2. passive/defensive – create a permanent portfolio that runs on autopilot and requires no further effort but generates very little excitement (emotionally demanding)
  2. How to allocate amongst stocks and bonds for defensive investors?
    1. “Age” is arbitrary and pointless
    2. Instead, consider the fundamental circumstances of your life and the financial needs you’ll have for the foreseeable future
    3. For the aggressive investor, 25% in bonds and cash, 75% in stocks
    4. For the defensive investor, 25% in stocks and 75% in bonds and cash
    5. Rebalancing should be done on a predictable, disciplined basis– not when the market dictates, but when the “calendar” or schedule does
  3. Income investing (bond choices)
    1. Taxable or tax free? Choose tax free (municipal) unless you are in the lowest income bracket
    2. Short-term or long-term? Intermediate term bonds of 5-10yrs allow you to avoid the guessing game and see-saw risks of short and long-term bonds
    3. Bonds or bond funds? Unless you have a lot of capital to make minimum purchases, probably more cost effective to buy a bond fund
    4. Watch out for preferred stock, the worst of both worlds
      1. Secondary claim on assets in bankruptcies (junior to bonds)
      2. Offer less potential profit than common equity because they are often forcibly called by businesses when interest rates drop or credit ratings improve
      3. Companies can not deduct the interest payments like they can with bond issuance, ask yourself, “Why would a company that is healthy issue preferred rather than bonds?” Answer is, probably because they aren’t healthy
    5. Sometimes, stocks can offer competitive yields with Treasuries, which can increase income yield while raising potential return (as well as increasing potential risk of loss)

Chapter 5, JZ commentary

  1. Markets are least risky after a crash, most risky at the top
  2. Should you buy what you know? Psychological studies say that we tend to discount risk inappropriately when we feel we are experts on something due to familiarity
  3. Dollar-cost averaging can be a disciplined way to force oneself to invest through bear and bull markets

Chapter 6, JZ commentary

  1. Junk bonds
    1. Graham warned against them because they were difficult to diversify away the risks of default; today, many junk bond funds exist which allow an investor to diversify
    2. While junk bonds have outperformed 10yr UST even with historical default rates factored in, many junk bond funds charge high fees which reduces their appeal
  2. Emerging market bonds
    1. Typically not correlated with US equity markets
    2. Restrict holdings in bond portfolio to 10% (published 2003)
  3. Day trading
    1. The increased transaction costs of day trading is a surefire way to bomb a portfolio
    2. Day trading raises transaction costs to the point where returns must be beyond what one could reasonably expect to make with a conservative estimation of returns, just to break even
  4. IPOs
    1. Most people who have bought-and-held IPOs have been decimated over time
    2. Hard to find value in the mania buying of an IPO
    3. The public excitement of an IPO often leads investors to forget about valuing the underlying business; many investors have paid ridiculous sums for businesses that were not profitable and never had a chance of being profitable
    4. “It’s Probably Overpriced”

Chapter 7, JZ commentary

  1. Market timing is essentially a fools errand: Life can only be understood looking backwards, but it is lived forwards.
  2. Growth stocks– the faster the companies grow, the higher goes their stock multiples
    1. A $1B company can double its business fairly easily, but how will a $50B company double itself?
    2. A great company is not a great investment if you pay too much for it
    3. When growth companies expand beyond 25-30 times earnings, they’re expensive and should not be bought
    4. One way growth companies could become temporarily attractive is when they suffer a setback or disclosure of upsetting information, creating “the relatively unpopular large company.”
  3. Most great fortunes in the world are made through concentration into one industry or business idea; similarly, most great fortunes are lost this way as well
    1. Because markets are sometimes cyclical, people who got rich in one industry as it boomed will likely lose their fortunes in that same industry when it busts
  4. Bargain hunting for stocks can be a winning strategy; consider stocks that are selling at or for less than their net working capital (Current Assets – Total Liabilities, including preferred stock and long-term debt)
    1. One way to quickly find these stocks can be to search for companies that have recently hit new lows for the past 52 weeks
  5. Diversifying outside the US (or home market) is adviseable because national economies suffer booms and busts as well as specific industries do
    1. If you had been Japanese in 1989, you would probably think it foolish to invest in America; however, you would lose 2/3 of your equity value over the ensuing decade as a result
    2. The country that you live and work in is already a multilayered bet on the economic prospects of that country’s economy; buying foreign stocks (including emerging markets) provides insurance against the possibility that your home market might be a laggard

Chapter 8, JZ commentary

  1. Do not let the movement of Mr. Market, up or down, affect your decision on whether to buy or sell a particular company or stock at a particular time
    1. Don’t buy just because the market is going up
    2. Don’t sell just because the market is going down
  2. Graham: “The primary cause of failure is that they pay too much attention to what the stock market is doing currently.”
  3. Investing intelligently is about controlling the uncontrollable
    1. your brokerage costs
    2. your ownership costs (mutual fund fees)
    3. your expectations (keep them reasonable)
    4. your risk (how much of your total assets do you put into each investment)
    5. your tax bills (short vs. long term cap gains)
    6. your own behavior
  4. “To be an intelligent investor, you must also refuse to judge your financial success by how a bunch of total strangers are doing”
    1. You haven’t lost if everyone else has won
    2. You haven’t won if everyone else has lost
    3. Focus on your own absolute performance
  5. Remember: market quotations are what other people think the value of a stock is– not what the true value of the stock is in relation to underlying intrinsic value
  6. Selling into a bear market can occasionally make sense in relation to taking a realized loss for tax purposes; consult a tax professional before doing so

Chapter 9, JZ commentary

  1. The pitfalls of mutual funds:
    1. avg fund does not pick stocks well enough to overcome the costs of researching and trading them
    2. the higher a fund’s expenses, the lower its returns
    3. the more frequently a fund trades, the less it tends to earn
    4. highly volatile funds tends to stay volatile
    5. funds with high past returns are unlikely to remain winners for long
  2. Why don’t more winning funds stay winners?
    1. migrating managers; top mgrs get picked off by higher paying companies or go on to start their own funds
    2. asset elephantitis; when a fund is too large, it reduces the types and size of investments it can possibly make, reducing its nimbleness
    3. no more fancy footwork; many fund “incubate” before going public and whatever advantages they had during incubation are generally lost afterward, yet they use the incubation period performance to promote the fund
    4. rising expenses; it often costs more to trade in size than to trade smaller because markets become illiquid when trading in size
    5. sheepishness/herding; fund mgrs who have been successful and attract higher fees grow accustomed to these fees and their reputation and don’t want to take any risks that might jeopardize either one, so they trade like other fund mgrs
  3. The solution for the individual investor is boring, low cost index funds– they won’t beat the market, but they won’t get beaten by it either
  4. How to pick good mutual funds?
    1. managers should be the biggest shareholders
    2. they should be cheap/low fee; high returns are temporary, high fees are permanent
    3. they should be run creatively and “dare to be different”
    4. they shut the door before they get too big
    5. they don’t advertise much if at all
  5. Expense fee guidelines:
    1. taxable and muni bonds, .75%
    2. US equities, 1%
    3. high-yield bonds, 1%
    4. US equities (small stocks), 1.25%
    5. foreign equities, 1.5%
  6. When to sell a mutual fund?
    1. a sharp and unexpected change in strategy
    2. an increase in expenses
    3. large and frequent tax bills (caused by excessive trading)
    4. suddenly erratic returns (big gains or big losses)

Chapter 11, JZ commentary

  1. Five decisive elements for determining price multiples
    1. the company’s “general long-term prospects”
      1. Warning flags
        1. the company is a serial acquirer, gaining revenues and profit growth through the acquisition of other businesses
        2. the company is addicted to OPM and is continually floating debt or issuing new stock
          1. cash from operating activities negative, while cash from financing activities positive, on a general or recurring basis, means the company is not profitable in its own line of industry
        3. the company relies on one or only a handful of important customers to generate a significant share of its revenues and profits
      2. Positives in company analysis
        1. the company has a wide “moat” to competition
          1. brand identity
          2. monopoly or near-monopoly
          3. economies of scale
          4. unique intangible asset
          5. resistance to substitution
        2. the company is a marathoner, not sprinter
          1. revenues and income should grow steadily, not in spurts
          2. less likely to attract and then offend “hot stock” money
        3. the company sows and reaps
          1. the company should be spending on R&D to develop new lines of growth in the future
          2. 3-6% of revenues by industry is a typical measure
    2. the quality of its management
      1. is it looking out for #1?
        1. executives should not be paid too much
        2. company should not be reissuing or repricing stock options constantly
        3. use fully-diluted share totals when calculating EPS
        4. insiders should not be selling the company
      2. are they managers or promoters?
        1. mgrs should spend most of their time managing, not being in the media promoting the company’s stock
        2. watch out for accounting opaqueness, recurring non-recurring charges, ordinary extraordinary items and the focus on EBITDA rather than net income, etc.
    3. the financial strength and capital structure
      1. it should generate more cash than it consumes
      2. cash from operations should grow steadily over time
        1. use “owner earnings” (Net Income + Amortization + Depreciation – Cost of Stock Options – Unusual/Nonrecurring Charges – Company Pension Fund “Income”)
      3. capital structure considerations
        1. total debt ( + preferred stock) should be under 50% of total capital
        2. is debt fixed-rate or variable, exposing the company to interest rate risk (check footnotes)?
        3. check annual reports for “ratio of earnings to fixed costs” which can demonstrate if the company is able to make interest payments
    4. its dividend record
      1. the burden of proof is on the company to prove they shouldn’t issue you a dividend because they can grow the company better with the retained earnings
      2. the stock should not be split constantly
      3. stock buybacks should occur when the company’s shares are cheap, not at record highs
    5. its current dividend rate

Chapter 12, JZ commentary

  1. Accounting gimmickery
    1. make sure capitalized expenses really ought to be capitalized
    2. watch out for firms realizing revenues on their accounting statements that they have not actually earned
    3. inventory write-downs should not be occurring regularly if the company is using proper inventory accounting methods
    4. “net pension benefit” should not be more than 5% of the company’s net income
  2. How to avoid accounting fraud
    1. read backwards; the dirty secrets are buried at the end
    2. read the notes; never buy a stock without reading the footnotes in the annual report
      1. look for terms like “capitalized”, “deferred” and “restructuring”
    3. read more; check out Financial Statement Analysis (Fridson and Alvarez), The Financial Number’s Game (Comiskey), Financial Shenanigans (Schilit)

Chapter 14, JZ commentary

  1. Investing for the defensive investor
    1. Substantially all of ones stock picks should be limited to a total stock market index fund; or, 90% total stock market index fund and 10% individual stock picks
  2. Graham’s criteria for stock selection:
    1. adequate size; market cap > $2B, unless owned through a “small cap mutual fund” that allows for diversification
    2. strong financial condition; 2:1 current assets:current liabilities ratio
    3. earnings stability; some earnings for the common stock in each of the past ten years
    4. dividend record; the company should pay a dividend, even better if it increases over time
    5. earnings growth; 33% cumulative EPS growth over ten years, or essentially, 3% annual EPS growth
    6. moderate p/e ratio; current price should be no more than 15x avg earnings over past 3 yrs
    7. moderate price-to-book ratio; price-to-assets/price-to-book-value ratio of no more than 1.5
    8. alternatively, multiply p/e ratio by price-to-book and the number should be below 22.5
  3. Do the due diligence
    1. do your homework; read at least 5 yrs worth of annual and qtrly reports and proxy statements disclosing managers’ compensation, ownership, and potential conflicts of interest
    2. check out the neighborhood; check for institutional ownership ratios, over 60% probably means the company is overowned and overpriced
      1. if one sells, they’ll all sell; could be a time to find bargains in that stock
      2. check who the biggest holders are, if they’re money mgrs that invest like you, you could be in good hands

Chapter 15, JZ commentary

  1. You can practice stock-picking for a year, without investing any real money, and see how you do
    1. if you beat the S&P500, maybe you are good enough to pick stocks
    2. if you don’t, stick to index funds
  2. How to pick stocks for the enterprising investor
    1. Start with stocks that have recently hit 52 week lows
    2. use the ROIC method of analysis; ROIC = Owner Earnings / Invested Capital, where Owner Earnings is:
      1. Operating Profit + Depreciation + Amortization of Goodwill – Federal Income Tax – Cost of Stock Options – Maintenance (Essential CapEx) – Income Generated By Pension Funds
      2. Invested Capital = Total Assets – Cash and ST Investments + Past Accounting Charges That Reduced Invested Capital
      3. ROIC can demonstrate, after legitimate expenses, what the company earns from its operating businesses and how efficiently it has used shareholders’ money to generate that return
      4. ROIC of 10% is attractive, 6-7% in special occasions with strong brand name, focused management or the company being temporarily unpopular
    3. you can also look for comparable companies that have been acquired recently for valuations for the company you are looking at
      1. check the “Business Segments” (or “Management Discussion and Analysis”) section of the company’s annual report for industrial sector, revenues and earnings of each subsidiary
      2. then, check Factiva, ProQuest or LexisNexis for examples of other firms in the same industry that have been acquired
      3. then, look at past ARs for these companies for information about purchase price to earnings for those companies before acquisition
      4. this might reveal a “60-cent dollar”, a company whose assets and earnings are selling for 60% or less than the businesses might be worth to an acquirer

Chapter 20, JZ commentary

  1. The first objective of investing: “Don’t lose.”; this is Graham’s “margin of safety” concept in a nutshell
  2. Consider a market that is returning 5% a year, while you have found a stock that you think can grow at 10%; if you overpay for it and suffer a capital loss of 50% in the first year, it will take you 16 years to overtake the market, and nearly 10 years just to break even again
  3. The biggest financial risk we face is ourselves; ask yourself the following questions:
    1. How much experience do I have? What is my track record with similar decisions in the past?
    2. What is the typical track record of other people who have tried this in the past?
    3. If I am buying, someone is selling. How likely is it that I know something they don’t know?
    4. If I am selling, someone else is buying. How likely is it that I know something they don’t know?
    5. Have I calculated how much this investment needs to go up to cover my taxes and trading expenses?
  4. Then, make sure you have considered the consequences of being wrong by asking yourself:
    1. How much could I lose if I am wrong?
    2. Do I have other investments that will tide me over if this decision turns out to be wrong? Am I putting too much capital at risk?
    3. Have I demonstrated a high tolerance for risk by continuing to invest after large losses in the past?
    4. Am I relying on willpower alone to prevent me from panicking or have I made preparations in advance by diversifying and dollar-cost averaging?
  5. “In making decisions under conditions of uncertainty, the consequences must dominate the probabilities. We never know the future.”
  6. Never make the mistake of following investment crazes or putting all your eggs in one basket; if you make one error, you will have wiped yourself out
  7. Instead, diversify, and always protect yourself from the consequences of being wrong just as much as you hope and plan to enjoy the benefits of being right

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Notes – A Compilation Of Ideas On Investing

How to Screen for Hidden Champions

  • If I could recommend only one book for value investors to read it would be Hidden Champions of the Twenty-First Century
  • Reading about Exxon Mobil (XOM) and Apple (AAPL) and Starbucks (SBUX) and thinking you are becoming a business expert is like reading about blue whales and elephants and thinking you are becoming an animal expert. Tiny insects are a lot more common than giant mammals
  • Screening for Hidden Champions:
    • 10 years consistent >= 15% op margin and market cap < $1B
    • 10 years consistent >= 15% ROE and market cap < $1B
    • 10 years consistent >= 8% ROA and market cap <$1B
    • 10 years consistent EPS increase and market cap < $1B
  • If an ultra-conservatively managed family company earns 10% on equity it would probably earn closer to 20% on equity if it was sold to a professionally managed multinational
  • Some companies have negative equity, to correct for this, screen for >= 8% ROA regardless of ROE
  • The best place to screen for hidden champions in the UK is SharelockHolmes

Backtesting Net-Nets: Does It Matter?

  • Net-nets are a symptom of the overall stock market’s health
  • You should ignore a net-net for two years after you buy it, at minimum
  • The key to a successful NCAV portfolio is to not sell your winners too fast
  • If a stock has low institutional ownership, low short interest, no analyst coverage, and a small number of shares outstanding – nobody is looking at the company; buy net-nets where institutions own the fewest shares
  • Inactivity is necessary to really judge your net-net selection skills
  • If you are just taking a profit (or loss) in a net-net within 1 to 2 years of buying it – I think you’ve basically just traded a stock on a different basis than you analyzed it
  • A good net-net is really just a decent business. Why would insiders still control 10% to 50% of a company that has been public for 10 to 30 years?
  • Try to buy the “best” net-net available each month with an emphasis on “safe” rather than “cheap”
  • Attractive net-net criteria:
    • Long history of consistent profitability
    • Long tenured CEO
    • High insider ownership
    • Low leverage
    • High cash relative to share price
    • Good capital allocation decisions
    • Simple business
    • Good business
    • Lasting business
  • Ideally, you don’t want to pay more than the company’s own cash for the stock
  • High insider ownership in a newly public company doesn’t have the same meaning as it does at an old company
  • Dividends are nice, not because they’re important but because of what dividends are a symptom of
  • Retailers are tough net-nets; a retailer that loses some of its competitiveness is a retailer that could be out of business in a matter of years
  • How to sabotage a NCAV portfolio: sell too soon; if you sell your winners when they go up, you destroy the performance of a net-net; the big winners are needed to outweigh the big losers and the mediocre performers
  • The holding of net-nets is critical
  • Slowly assemble a net-net portfolio over a period of a couple years, and don’t sell anything for those first two years

Should You Wait for a Crash – Or Buy Today’s Best Bargain?

  • To get consistently good investment results, follow one of two programs:
    • Buy companies that are clearly selling for less than their conservatively calculated value to a private owner
    • Buy companies that will earn high returns on capital while growing quickly for many, many, many years to come
  • During periods of panic, look for obvious mispricings; for example, high quality companies trading at less than 10x FCF; 10x free cash flow is less than stocks are generally worth
  • To fill a portfolio in the midst of a market crash, have a shopping list of companies you like but are overpriced ahead of time
  • You are very unlikely to cause any sort of catastrophic problem for yourself just by overpaying for the right kind of company. Buying the wrong company is your biggest risk
  • Just wait for an obviously wonderful business selling for the kind of price a normal stock sells for in normal times

Warren Buffett Checklist to Invest in a Great Business: KO

  • Buffett had 9 criteria he examined when determining whether he was investing in a great business:
    • Does the business have an identifiable consumer monopoly?
    • Are the earnings of the company strong and showing an upward trend?
    • Is the company conservatively financed?
    • Does the business consistently earn a high rate of return on shareholders’ equity?
    • Does the business get to retain its earnings?
    • How much does the business have to spend on maintaining current operations?
    • Is the company free to reinvest retained earnings in new business opportunities, expansion of operations, or share repurchases? How good a job does the management do at this?
    • Is the company free to adjust prices to inflation?
    • Will the value added by retained earnings increase the market value of the company?

Free Cash Flow: Adjusting for Acquisitions, Capital Allocation and Corporate Character

  • Make your Ben Graham investments on an EV/EBIT basis
  • Make your Warren Buffett investments on a price-to-free-cash-flow (P/FCF or P/OE) basis

How to Read a 10-K: What is the Most Important Part?

  • The only 10-K I read from cover to cover is the most recent 10-K
  • Print out and mark up a hard copy of the latest 10-K, 10-Q, and 14A
  • Check all of the 8-Ks and 13Gs from the last year or so
  • If there was a scandal, a proxy battle, legal case, unconsummated merger, etc. – read the 8-Ks and other documents surrounding that time period even if it was many years ago
  • Read the oldest 10-K as well as the newest
  • Read any shareholder letters ever written that are still available
  • Enter Balance Sheet, Cash Flow and Income Statement data into an Excel spreadsheet for every year the company reported to EDGAR
  • Always have at least 10 years of data
  • Look at the notes to the financial statements most critically
  • Ask yourself the following questions:
    • What is customer behavior in the industry?
    • Why do customers choose what they choose?
    • What does management really think? What are they really like?
  • Gannon prefers investing in companies where he understands customer behavior the best

How Long Should You Hold a Net-Net?

  • All we need to do is make sure that the stocks we buy are clearly worth more than we pay for them
  • Forget about trading a net-net a full year after buying it and instead focus on the two things that matter most:
    • Picking the right stock (company)
    • Holding that stock regardless of what the market does
  • Never sell a net-net in less than one year unless:
    • You made a mistake
    • You need to buy something else (that’s better)
  • A one to five year holding period is the right length for net-nets
  • Never sell a net-net just because it reached NCAV; NCAV is still really, really cheap

How to Get a Job in Value Investing

  • Look for someone trying to build a research team from scratch
  • The best combination is often when the position is brand new and the right person was impressed ahead of time
  • Do lots of research for free and then let it get into the hands of someone who can hire an analyst
  • Talk to everybody whose work you respect by sending them an email; share your best ideas with them
  • Set aside time to writing and reading about value investing every single day
  • Don’t send your casual thoughts to those you’re trying to impress; you want them to think of you as a thorough, insightful researcher

What is the Buffett/Munger Bargains Newsletter?

  • Investing in net-nets is the best way for a dedicated, “do-it-yourself” individual investor to beat the market
  • The newsletter’s strategy is to find companies with the following attributes:
    • Simple business
    • Favorable long-term prospects
    • Able and honest management
    • Consistent earnings
    • Good ROE
    • Little debt
    • Very attractive price
  • It is modeled on the Buffett/Munger of the 1970s
  • “Really good businesses usually don’t need to borrow… they make the most of an already strong business franchise or concentrate on a single winning business theme” -Buffett
  • Use the higher of today’s interest rates and long-term average interest rates when considering valuations

How I Pick Stocks for the Ben Graham Net-Net Newsletter

  • Traditionally, big net-nets have been poor performers
  • The ratio of insider ownership to institutional ownership is actually one of the best predictors of the future stock market performance of a net-net
  • What makes for a good net-net?
    • High insider ownership / Low institutional ownership
    • High F-Score
    • Consistent earnings
    • Simple business
    • Decent ROE
    • Decent long-term prospects
  • The idea is to get the best business for the lowest price

How Should You Divide Your Research Time?

  • I put my energy towards whatever is most clearly undervalued
  • I keep cash close to 0% when I have good ideas
  • The important thing is picking the exact right company and then picking the approximately right price
  • I spent probably half a year thinking about buying DWA before I put in my buy order
  • A typical net-net for me is a 10% position held for just over a year
  • I spend almost half my time looking at net-nets and almost half my time looking at high quality companies
  • I look longer at each high quality company I research
  • Required reading:
    • Warren Buffett’s Letter to Shareholders (1977-Present)
    • Warren Buffett’s Letter to Partners (1959-1969)
    • The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life
    • Buffett: The Making of An American Capitalist
    • Poor Charlie’s Almanack
    • Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits (by Phil Fisher)
    • The Interpretation of Financial Statements (by Ben Graham)
    • The Intelligent Investor (1949 Edition)
    • Security Analysis (1940 Edition)
    • Benjamin Graham on Investing
    • Benjamin Graham: The Memoirs of the Dean of Wall Street
    • One Up on Wall Street (by Peter Lynch)
    • Beating the Street (by Peter Lynch)
    • You Can Be a Stock Market Genius (by Joel Greenblatt)
    • The Little Book That Beats the Market (by Joel Greenblatt)
    • There’s Always Something to Do (about Peter Cundill)
    • The Money Masters
    • Money Masters of Our Time
    • Hidden Champions of the Twenty-First Century
    • Jim Collins Books: Built to Last, Good to Great, How the Mighty Fall, and Great by Choice
    • Distant Force (about Henry Singleton)
    • Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions and The Essential Tension
  • Specific reading on extreme market conditions:
    • The Big Short
    • Too Big to Fail
    • This Time is Different
    • When Genius Failed
    • The Panic of 1907
  • Knowing about historical episodes is understanding what the paper looked like every morning to folks who were as blind to the future as you are now
  • Case studies of investments made by investors whose books, letters, etc., the student has read
  • Side-by-side comparisons of stocks with the names of the companies omitted, for example:
    • Buffett’s investment in GEICO, Wells Fargo, Coca-Cola, Gilette, etc.
    • Graham’s investment in Northern Pipeline, DuPont/GM (long/short), etc.
    • Phil Fisher’s examples in his book
    • Joel Greenblatt’s examples from his books
    • Peter Cundill’s investments in his biography
    • Peter Lynch’s investments in his books
    • MSFT at different points in its history, WMT versus Costco, present day modern US railroads, present day comparison of high-quality large versus high-quality small company, comparison of present-day hated companies and historical Warren Buffett equivalent
  • Value investing is mostly about doing original research alone
  • New value investors love reading books on theory and technique; they spend too lite time studying specific stocks
  1. Open Google Translate
  2. Find the stock on its home stock exchange
  3. Read the company’s annual reports
  4. Study comparable companies in your home country
  5. Enter the stock’s past financials in a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet
  6. Use the past financials and comparison companies to appraise the stock’s value to a private buyer
  7. Compare the stock’s appraised value to its market price
  8. If the market price is more than 75% of the appraised value, forget about the stock
  9. If the market price is less than 50% of the appraised value, focus on the stock
  10. Otherwise: use your best judgment

Review – There’s Always Something To Do

There’s Always Something to Do: The Peter Cundill Investment Approach

by Christopher Risso-Gill, published 2011

A short read, There’s Always Something to Do was nonetheless an entertaining and informative one. Peter Cundill’s life serves as an example of what a value investor can be and should be– consistent, disciplined, well-traveled, philosophical and patient. One of Cundill’s comments in a journal entry stood out from the rest, and not just because it was over-emphatically written in all caps:

THE MOST IMPORTANT ATTRIBUTE FOR SUCCESS IN VALUE INVESTING IS PATIENCE, PATIENCE AND MORE PATIENCE. THE MAJORITY OF INVESTORS DO NOT POSSESS THIS ATTRIBUTE.

As an investor, you always have to ask yourself what your edge is in any particular situation. For a value investor who tries to “buy dollars for 40 cents” (the slogan of the Cundill Value Fund) and who insists on a margin of safety, often that edge is patience. Buying at a steep discount to perceived value with no concern for relative and contemporary outperformance of arbitrary benchmarks means the patient value investor is often in a position to be paid to wait. This puts him ahead of the game because, as Peter Cundill observes, most investors can’t or aren’t this patient.

The other prime lesson to be learned from Peter Cundill’s life is that value investing is hard work. As the title of the book, an Irving Kahn quote, implies,

There’s always something to do. You just need to look harder, be creative and a little flexible.

Cundill traveled thousands of miles every year, establishing networks of trusted value investors and other local eyes-and-ears he could get ideas from and visiting the world’s stock exchanges in search of the ones with the worst performance record over the previous 11 months. “Given the dearth of bargains today, it pays to search for them everywhere,” Cundill said.

Unending effort and determination came with the territory. Cundill reveled in the difficult, a complicated or hard to decipher balance sheet, particularly one belonging to a foreign company, was not a reason to get upset about the hardships of the business but was rather an opportunity in disguise because such a balance sheet represented a “barrier to entry” for other investors. Cundill’s creativity often led him to look for a “colony of success”, believing that if he found one amazing business story in a particular industry or country that was otherwise depressed, there might be others nearby. In time, Peter came to surround himself with people who believed that “having a hangover was a waste of a day.” Time spent nursing oneself of the effects of the night before was time one couldn’t spend pursuing investment excellence.

Cundill embraced the constant struggle, philosophically choosing to focus on enjoying the journey rather than focusing on the destination. In a piece of personal poetry Cundill observed “no fortunes are made in prosperity, ours is a marathon without end: enjoy the passing moments.”

Cundill was not just a great investor but a great thinker. He spent a lot of time in moments of reflection, contemplating the perfection of his process in various aspects of his investing career and personal life. Below I have captured and organized a few of my favorites to come back to for inspiration in the future.

The Investment Process and Understanding Business

  • I think that intelligent forecasting should not seek to predict what will in fact happen in the future. Its purpose ought to be to illuminate the road, to point out obstacles and potential pitfalls and so assist management to tailor events and to bend them in the desired direction.
  • In a macro sense it may be more useful to spend time analysing industries instead of national or international economies.
  • It must be essential to develop and specify a precise investment policy that investors can understand and rely on the portfolio manger to implement.
  • In the end, it is always the economic facts and the values which are the determining factors.
  • It is also dangerous to rely on a single strategy in a doctrinaire fashion. Strategies and disciplines ought always to be tempered by intelligence and intuition.
  • The boards of charitable foundations are convenient meeting places for influential people. Their ostensible purpose is intimately bound up with the social and commercial ones.
  • I will never use inside information or seek it out. “All you get from inside information is a whiff of bad breath.”
  • If there’s no natural skeptic on an investment maybe it would be wise to appoint one of the team to play Devil’s Advocate anyway.
On Value Investing
  • Being out on a limb, alone and appearing to be wrong is just part of the territory of value investment.
  • Very few people really do their homework properly, so now I always check for myself.
  • The great records are the product of individuals, perhaps working together, but always within a clearly defined framework. In reality outstanding records are made by dictators, hopefully benevolent, but nonetheless dictators.
  • Accounting is a bear market phenomenon. (on people overlooking accounting oversights in bull markets)
  • Every company ought to have an escape valve: inventory that can readily be reduced, a vision that can be sold, a marketable investment portfolio, an ability to shed staff quickly.
  • We always look for the margin of safety in the balance sheet and then worry about the business.
  • We go short on markets, not individual securities.
  • When there aren’t a lot of net-net situations around I get worried about the market and start to sell into cash.
  • When things get so bad that you’re really scared, that’s the time to buy.
  • You have to be willing to wear bellbottoms when everyone else is wearing stovepipes.
  • The problem with big businesses that have moats around them is they tend to over-expand.
  • Search out the new lows.
  • IPOs for the most part are dreams engineered by the hope that pro forma estimates will be met. We deal to a certain degree with the nightmares that everyone knows about.
  • I am a bear market buyer; I like to sell into strength.
  • When a stock doubles, sell half — then what you have is a free position.
  • I pay much more attention to the balance sheet than the profit and loss statement and am always looking for hidden assets on the books.
The Philosophy of Life
  • Good poets borrow and great poets steal.
  • Retirement is a death warrant.
  • An ability to see the funny side of oneself  as it is seen by others is a strong antidote to hubris.
  • Routines and discipline go hand in hand. They are the road map that guides the pursuit of excellence for its own sake.
  • Patience, patience and more patience.
  • Curiosity is the engine of civilization.

Other Notes

  • Peter got together conferences of people with different perspectives and interests and invited guest speakers who were experts on things other than investing to broaden everyone’s mind through inter-disciplinary thinking
  • Peter moved his fund’s operations to London when it was the finance capital of the world; where is today’s London?
  • Peter would automatically sell investments as they got far beyond their intrinsic value (as measured by P/B), thereby creating a “safety valve” that caused him to go to cash heading into bubbles/crashes
  • In emerging markets, Peter looked for an asset-based margin of safety through large fixed assets, which were a lot more difficult to steal or carry off than a pile of cash.
  • Peter sometimes used the “Magic 6s”– stocks trading for 60% of book value, a 6x P/E multiple and a 6% dividend yield.

Review – The Art of Execution

The Art of Execution: How the world’s best investors get it wrong and still make millions

by Lee Freeman-Shor, published 2015

Note: I received a promotional copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for sharing my thoughts AFTER reading it.

Professor Failure

What can we learn from failure? Aside from the fact that there’s an entire industry of business literature fetishizing the idea that it has much to teach us (as a kind of doppelgänger to the decades of success literature that took a person or business’s success as given and tried to look backward for an unmistakeable pattern that could’ve predicted it) I’m personally skeptical of what failure might teach. Life is complex and there is often little to separate the failure and the success but timing and luck in certain endeavors.

So, I approached Freeman-Shors book with some trepidation as the subtitle of the book suggests this is a study of failure. Au contraire, what we have here is actually a psychological or behavioral study, somewhat in the vein of Benjamin “you are your own worst enemy in investing” Graham, which studies not failure per se, but rather how investors respond differently to failure and thereby either seal their fate or redeem themselves.

A Behavioral Typology

The book recounts the investment results of several different groups of portfolio managers who were categorized, ex post facto, into various groups based upon how they reacted to adverse market conditions for stocks they invested in. The Rabbits rode most of their failed investments down to near-zero before bailing out and taking the loss. The Assassins had a prescribed set of rules for terminating a losing position (either a % stop-loss, or a maximum time duration spent in the investment such as a year or a quarter). The Hunters kept powder dry and determined ahead of time to buy more shares on a pullback (ie, planned dollar-cost averaging).

While I am suspicious of backward-looking rule fitting, I do think the author’s logic makes sense. What it boils down to is having a plan ahead of time for how you’d react to failure. The Rabbits biggest mistake is they had none whatsoever, while the Assassins managed to protect themselves from total drawdowns but perhaps missed opportunities to profit on volatility rebounds. The author seems most impressed with the Hunters, who habitually started at a less than 100% commitment of funds to a planned position and then added to their investment at lower prices when the market gave them an opportunity to do so.

Freeman-Shor’s point is that when the price falls on your investment you need to decide that something material has changed in the story or facts and you sell, or else you need to be ready to buy more (because if it was a good buy at $10, it’s a great buy at $5, etc.) but you can not just hang tight. That isn’t an investment strategy. This is why I put this book in the Benjamin Graham fold, the message is all about being rational ahead of time about how you’d react to the volatility of the market which is for all intents and purposes a given of the investing landscape.

Learning From Success, Too

The author goes over a couple other behavioral typologies, Raiders and Connoisseurs. I won’t spoil the whole book, it suffices to say that this section is worth studying as well because it can be just as nerve-wracking to try to figure out whether to take some profit or let a winner ride when you have one. Freeman-Shor gives some more thoughts based on his empirical observations of other money managers who have worked for him on when it’s best to do one or the other.

More helpfully, he summarizes the book with a winner’s and loser’s checklist.

The Winner’s Checklist includes:

  1. Best ideas only
  2. Position size matters
  3. Be greedy when winning
  4. Materially adapt when losing
  5. Only invest in liquid stocks

The last bit is probably most vital for a fund manager with redeemable capital.

The Loser’s Checklist includes:

  1. Invest in lots of ideas
  2. Invest a small amount in each idea
  3. Take small profits
  4. Stay in an investment idea and refuse to adapt when wrong
  5. Do not consider liquidity

Free e-Book With Purchase!

It is hard for me to decide in my own mind if this book is a 3.5 or a 4 on a 5-point scale. I think of a 5 as a classic, to be read over and over again, gleaning something new each time. This would be a book like Security Analysis or The Intelligent Investor. A 4 is a good book with a lot of value and a high likelihood of being referenced in the future, but not something I expect to get a new appreciation for each and every time I read it. A 3 is a book that may have been enjoyable overall and provided some new ideas but was overall not as interesting or recommendable.

While I enjoyed this book and did gain some insight from it, and I think the editorial choices in the book were bold, it’s closer to a 3 in my mind than a 4 just in terms of the writing and the ideas. I’ve found a lot of the content in other venues and might’ve rated it higher on my epiphany scale if this was one of the first investment books I ever read. But something that really blew me away is that the publisher, Harriman House, seems to have figured out that people who buy paper books definitely appreciate having an e-Book copy for various reasons and decided to include a copy for free download (DRM-free!!) in the jacket of the book. This is huge. I read my copy on a recent cross-country flight and was really agonizing about which books from my reading stack wouldn’t make the trip for carry-on space reasons and then realized I could take this one with me on my iPad and preserve the space for something else. So in terms of value, this book is a 4.

 

Review – Deep Value Investing

Deep Value Investing: Finding bargain shares with big potential

by Jeroen Bos, published 2013

Benjamin Graham’s Principles Applied

Although it provides a summary introduction to the theory of Benjamin Graham’s classic deep value (net-net and discount-to-book value) strategy, Bos’s “Deep Value Investing” is decidedly a practitioner’s guide, not a philosophical work. More accurately, it’s a collection of case studies for observation and analysis– what did and didn’t work in various key examples from Bos’s own investment portfolio.

This is the book’s strength, and weakness. It is a strength because any opportunity to peer into the portfolio of a working money manager and see not only what he’s done, but why he has done it, is often worth the price of admission. Bos gets hands on with the reader and provides the relevant information in each case study, including the start and end date and price of each trade, the relevant balance sheet information and per share calculations and a helpful chart of price movements over time to put it in perspective.

Most importantly, though, Bos provides a lot of qualitative detail that helps to flesh out the simple quantitative analysis. Many curious students of value investing will be happy to see Bos not only explains what piqued his initial interest in each security, but that he also talks about how long and why he waited to get involved in each opportunity and how he interpreted business developments in each case (positive and negative) along the way. He also provides an explanation as to why and how he exited each investment, whether it was a winner or a loser.

This is something that’s missing in most investment case study discussions and it’s a real value add with this book. Another value add is the online support materials for the book, including a record of all relevant publicly available information for each investment that Bos used in his analysis (so you can follow along and see if you can see what he saw), as well as a free eBook version of the title accessible with a special link.

As mentioned, the weakness of the book lies in the fact that it’s mostly a collection of case studies with little else to structure it. In that sense, while the material is approachable and certainly not technical or difficult by any means to comprehend, this is not a “beginner’s book” but better for a reader who has already read a more philosophical work such as Graham’s “The Intelligent Investor” or “Security Analysis”. After reading those, revisiting Bos’s “Deep Value Investing” should yield many profitable insights and appreciation for what he has managed to accomplish.

Additionally, a bit of information that is normally found in these “how I do what I do” guides, that being whether or not the author supports diversification or concentration of portfolio positions and how he sizes his positions and manages his portfolio as a whole in general, are noticeably absent. The mere addition of this insightful information might have pushed this book into the “4-star” range in terms of usefulness and candor. As it is, it’s a “3-star”, though a strong 3-star candidate. A good read, but not essential in any library and by no means a classic like “Security Analysis”, though of course it has no pretensions of being so.

If you’re “deep” into deep value strategies, or want to watch over the shoulder of a talented operator, Jeroen Bos’s “Deep Value Investing” is well worth picking up! Even veteran value guys have something to learn from Bos’s “qualitative-quantitative” combined approach and especially his criteria for exiting a successful investment as it “transforms” over time from a balance sheet to earnings play.

Other Notes

Some of my other favorite observations worth noting:

1.) Liquid assets are what we’re really interested in, for the strongest margin of safety

2.) Share prices tend to be volatile, but book values tend to be stable over time

3.) Service companies tend to offer good value opportunities because they’re light on fixed assets and heavy on current assets; they also have flexible business models that can quickly scale up or down depending on business conditions

4.) Cyclical stocks always look cheapest on an earnings basis at the top of their cycle and most expensive at the bottom of their cycle (which is ironically when they’e a best buy)

5.) To better understanding accounting statement terms, compare treatment of confusing items across different companies in the same industry

6.) When evaluating trade receivables, it’s important to understand who the company’s clients are

7.) Check lists of new 52-week lows for good value investment candidates

Notes – Walter Schloss 1989 Interview With OID

A couple weeks ago I found the 1989 Outstanding Investor’s Digest interview with Walter and Edwin Schloss on Scribd and took a few notes as I read, which I reproduce below for later reference:

  • In The Merchant Bankers, the story is told of the Warburg family giving up their fortune to flee Nazi Germany, providing two lessons: be contrarian; and a family should lose its wealth every 3rd generation to ensure descendants don’t become lazy and entitled
  • When father and son can get along in a business venture, they can benefit from “compound interest” of accumulated knowledge and technique within the family
  • During the “first ten years you get acquainted with what you’re doing” so don’t expect to smash it out of the park the moment you set out in a new concentration
  • Companies will avoid LBO takeovers by levering up and acquiring other businesses (such as competitors) themselves
  • “Lot’s of times when you buy a cheap stock for one reason, that reason doesn’t pan out, but another one does because it’s a cheap stock.”
  • “Sometimes you have to sue just to keep your self-respect.”
  • “It’s easier to know when something’s cheap than when it’s overvalued.”
  • “Concentrate on what you know and forget about everything else.”
  • According to Buffett, “If you’re not disciplined in the little things, you can’t be disciplined in the big things.”
  • “Partners, it seems to me, should have somewhat the same point of view” Schloss says about the value of corporate culture
  • Focus on working capital stocks, then 50% of BV stocks, then 66% of BV stocks and then 1x BV stocks w/ franchises or special situations
  • Look out for managers in it for themselves, even when the stock is cheap

Does Net-Net Investing Work In Japan?

If you took a look at the companies I purchased off my Japanese net-net (“JNet”) worksheet about six months ago, you’d probably conclude net-net investing doesn’t “work” in Japan, at least not over a six month period. The cheap, crappy companies I bought then are cheaper, still crappy companies today.

However, if you took a look at all the companies I didn’t buy from my list, you might get a different impression altogether. While there are a few companies of this group whose fundamentals worsened and/or whose stock price fell, most are up anywhere from 10-15% with several up substantially more, 30-50%. About 10% of the total list seems to have gone private as you can’t find financial info nor trade the symbol any longer, which in my experience in JNet-land typically means they received an MBO.

And if you look at an entirely different list of JNets I generated about two months ago (because all my original picks were no longer JNets), which I finished researching one month ago and which I failed to do anything about until yesterday, the story is even better (or worse, if you’re me). How would you like to see the top pick on your list closed up 25% the day prior and about 40% total since you composed your list? How would you like to see the average company on your list priced 15% or more higher from where you first researched it, meaning you could’ve locked in your 15% annual return for the year in a few months time?!

Once again, this list also had several symbols which no longer trade, presumably because they received buyouts or other going private transactions.

So, in the last few days I learned a few things about JNets:

  1. They “work”
  2. The “M&A activity in Japan, particularly in the small cap space, is a non-starter” claim, is a myth
  3. Even crappy businesses with cash-rich balance sheets are moving like hotcakes in Abenomic Japan
  4. The strengthening of the dollar against the Yen does impact your $ returns, but so far Yen prices on JNets have outpaced the move of the Yen against the dollar
  5. Contrary to my belief that I could take my time allocating idle capital in Japan, it now appears that time is of the essence

My old motto for JNets was, “Steady as she goes.” My new motto is, “Churn and burn” or “Turn and earn.” I’m going to be watching things much more closely than I had before.

To be clear, my experience so far has been frustrating, but it hasn’t been catastrophic as I suggested in my introduction. I have captured some of the windfall moves myself although I continue to have laggards in the portfolio, at least in dollar terms. Very few of the original companies I picked are trading lower than when I bought them, though some have not moved up enough yet to make up for the exchange rate loss. My first portfolio of JNets was bought when the Yen/$ rate was 79. It’s now almost 99 Yen to the dollar and I made my second portfolio purchase around 94 Yen to the dollar.

Overall, in dollar terms my first portfolio is up 5%, with one MBO and apparently another just recently as I found out the stock is up 43% with no ask but I haven’t found a news item explaining why yet. Several others traded above NCAV so I am culling them and putting them into new opportunities. I have not yet determined what the “secret formula” is for picking the JNets that will really take off– oddly, it was mostly the companies whose prospects seemed least fortunate that I neglected to purchase and was in shock to see their stock prices 35% higher or more. As a result, I plan on wider diversification and a more random strategy in choosing between “best” companies and cheapest stocks.

I’m sure many investors have done much better than 5% in Japan in the last half year, and many more have done better still in the US and elsewhere. This isn’t a contest of relative or absolute performance. This is simply an opportunity to settle the score and point out that yeah, Benjamin Graham’s philosophy is alive and well in Japan.

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