Review – Feeling Good

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy

by David Burns, published 1980, 2008

This post is less a review of the book and more an exploration of its major philosophical principles and techniques.

Major Principles

All your moods are created by your cognitions, or thoughts, including:

  • perceptions
  • mental attitudes
  • beliefs
  • interpretations

When you are feeling depressed, your thoughts are dominated by pervasive negativity which infect all of your experiences, including:

  • reflections on the past
  • experience of the present
  • projections/expectations of the future

Negative thoughts at the heart of emotional turmoil almost always contain gross distortions, therefore:

  1. gains in objectivity of thoughts translate to elevated mood
  2. the most crucial predictor of recovery is a persistent willingness to exert some effort to help yourself
  3. it is a part of the human experience to be periodically upset, “getting better” means systematically employing CBT methods to master thoughts and moods over the course of a lifetime

Diagnosing Your Moods

You can use the Burns Depression Checklist (the author’s proprietary list of indicators of depressive thinking) weekly to chart the progress of your depression’s severity. This is important because it introduces objective data into your self-experience. By seeing the change in data over time as a result of specific action, you can break the allure common to all depressive episodes that the present experience is likely to continue on indefinitely, or only get worse.

Understanding Your Moods

Depression is not an emotional disorder, it is a disorder of thoughts.

Practice noticing the negative thought you had just prior to your negative feeling. This will help you generate awareness about the specific “triggers” that instigate a depressive mood. You will begin to notice that right before you feel downcast, you have made a critical or despairing assumption about yourself or other people.

One argument depressed people make is that their depressive mood is an accurate reflection of a depressing reality. However, emotions do not happen automatically based upon experiences, but rather experiences are processed in the mind and filtered through pre-existing thoughts before being translated into an emotional state. Therefore, if your understanding of reality is normal, your resulting mood will be normal; if your understanding of reality is distorted, your mood will be distorted as well.

Thinking you are the one “hopeless”, truly flawed person in the world is a sign of distorted thinking. This is a belief based upon fallacious logical thinking rather than an objective, existent fact about reality knowable to all.

In its essence, depression is a highly credible form of faulty faith in a reality that doesn’t exist. Truly, the cure for long-lasting depression is a “scientific mind” determined to observe and examine reality using sound logical principles.

The 10 Major Cognitive Distortions

Depressive episodes are triggered by one of ten common cognitive distortions, or fundamental logical fallacies embedded in the assumptions and thinking of the depressed individual:

  1. All-or-Nothing Thinking, a form of perfectionism
  2. Overgeneralization, believing a single instance is an inevitable pattern
  3. Mental Filter, focusing on the negatives, ignoring the positives
  4. Disqualifying the Positive, turning positive experiences into negative ones by rationalizing why it was luck, a mistake or otherwise unrepeatable or undeserved
  5. Jumping to Conclusions,
    1. mind reading, convincing yourself others harbor negative thoughts or evaluations without checking it out
    2. fortune-telling, imagining something bad will happen without evidence or probability
  6. Magnification and Minimization, creating a sense of inferiority by catastrophic thinking about flaws and mistakes, while downplaying strengths or achievements
  7. Emotional Reasoning, confusing a negative feeling with a factual truth about reality
  8. Should Statements, frustrating yourself by comparing yourself and others to a perceived ideal rather than accepting reality as it is
  9. Labeling and Mislabeling, confusing your identity with a single action or perpetual state of being
  10. Personalization, taking responsibility for things that have nothing to do with you, or are outside your control

Sometimes people experiencing depression worry that if they do not experience the grief and upset feelings of depression, they will not be living authentically. Getting in touch with and expressing valid emotions based upon valid thinking, is a form of emotional maturity; expressing invalid emotions based on invalid thinking is a personal and sometimes social problem that is not at all desirable. Emotional growth and development involves ridding yourself of invalid thinking and the harmful, deluded and invalid emotions that come with it.

Defeating Do-Nothingism

In a depressive state of mind, it can be difficult to summon the determination, motivation and interest in moving one’s goals and life plans forward. Using the major principle mentioned earlier, it is important to consider what kind of self-critical triggering thoughts precede this unwillingness to act. When you are suffering “do-nothingism”, consider the following as a new mental habit:

When I think about an undone task, what thoughts immediately come to mind?

You are likely to find that these thoughts are filled with the logic of futility, hopelessness and general nihilism and discouragement.

Common Mindsets that Yield Action to Inaction

Here are some common cognitive distortions that precede do-nothingism:

  1. Hopelessness, the present pain is overwhelming and obstructs your ability to imagine an improved future
  2. Helplessness, something other than your own actions stands between you and achievement
  3. Overwhelming Yourself, you must do the whole tasks all at once, making it impossible
  4. Jumping to Conclusions, assuming without testing to find out
  5. Self-labeling, convincing yourself you’re fundamentally incapable by labeling yourself as such
  6. Undervaluing the Rewards, the payoff is so small, why bother?
  7. Perfectionism, preferring no progress to some progress
  8. Fear of Failure, it isn’t worth an attempt if the potential to succeed lies in doubt
  9. Fear of Success, you won’t be able to continue after your initial “luck”, so you don’t bother
  10. Fear of Disapproval or Criticism, you will be judged harshly by others for your attempt
  11. Coercion and Resentment, you are being forced to do something rather than choosing to do it for yourself
  12. Low Frustration Tolerance, or Entitlement Syndrome, it should be easy to succeed, if it’s not easy, you must not be made out for success
  13. Guilt and Self-Blame, punishing yourself over past perceived mistakes

You may notice that many of these cognitive distortions are simply “inaction-specific” versions of the earlier list from above.

Dealing With Anger

Anger is a common aspect of many depressive episodes. As depressed people tend not to carry out the values of their lives into action, they often experience frustration, resentment and anger about the seeming futility and malaise of their life, particularly when they are in touch with or aware of their latent talents and abilities. Anger is often directed outward at others as an expression of the pain within.

When you label someone, you tend to apply a mental filter that results in disqualifying the positive as you emphasize their poor traits and ignore their good ones. Labeling gives way to blame, blame leads to vengeance. Ironically, you can not enhance your self-esteem by attacking someone else’s, so this act of labeling and attacking the character of others in anger proves doubly harmful.

Mind-reading also leads to anger as you will tend to attribute false ideas and motivations to the other person’s behavior.

Magnification of the original negative event will cause greater than necessary pain and cause the pain to linger longer than it must.

Should/should not statements generate entitled beliefs and entitled thinking leads to resentment and frustration with other people as well as the self.

The perception of unfairness or injustice is the ultimate cause of anger. It is the emotion that corresponds 1:1 to your belief that you are being treated unfairly. Significantly, there is no universal standard for fairness or justice, only different ethical systems based upon tradition, circumstances and logical rationalization of self-interest and specific harmony.

Arguments over who is “right” are fruitless and unresolvable.

Some anger is healthy in motivating change. But to determine if your anger is motivational or de-motivational and depressive, consider these two criteria for anger:

  • is it directed at someone who knowingly, intentionally and unnecessarily acted in a hurtful manner?
  • is my anger useful? Does it help me achieve a desired goal or simply defeat me?

Techniques for managing anger:

  • use the double-column technique to explore advantages and disadvantages of feeling angry and engaging in retaliation
  • one you’re ready to calm down, use two column “hot thoughts” versus “cool thoughts” to explore angry versus rational thinking
  • rewrite your “should” rules to break free of entitled thinking
  • change your expectations of others, allow yourself the opportunity to see their behavior as predictable and not surprising
  • try empathy, see the world from your oppressor’s eyes and understand how what they did made sense and wasn’t personal

Examing Depressive Thinking

Some people are so depressed, all they can do is carry their whining and complaining with them everywhere they go. How do you deal with a whiner? Try the Anti-Whiner Technique– when someone complains, agree and compliment, don’t try to help. People who whine never want help solving their problems, they are looking for validation and security from others that their pain is real. By offering solutions, you unwittingly end up sending the message to the whiner that they’re incapable of helping themselves, are being victimized by reality and thus should continue whining!

There is no such thing as a “realistic” depression, although there are realistic reasons for temporarily feeling sad. Consider these two ideas about “realistic” depression:

  • sadness follows real loss or failure, is temporary and never impacts self-esteem negatively; this is a “realistic” depression
  • depression follows flawed or distorted thinking, is recurring and stems from/causes a loss of self-esteem; this is an “unrealistic” depression

Preventing future depressions:

  1. understand why you got depressed (many people never graduate beyond this step because they spend their entire lives in some form of depression!)
  2. know how and why you got better; what techniques were effective?
  3. acquire self-confidence and self-esteem
  4. locate the deeper causes of your depression (many people suffer recurring depression because they never bother to understand what kind of life experiences have made them vulnerable to depression, so they can be on guard against repeating these experiences or the harm of taking the wrong lessons from them)

Downward Arrow Technique, used to mine automatic thoughts for “logical consequences” of silent assumptions, the residue of recurring depressive episodes; then “talk-back” is used the challenge these beliefs.

Taking Action Against Depression

What problems do you face? How are you solving them? This is where the action is, not “worth” or “true self”.

People can spend their whole lives trying to get beneath their depression to an authentic understanding of self when really the difference between a depressed person and a non-depressed person, ultimately, is a willingness to take action to solve one’s own problems.

Why treat yourself in ways it would be rude or uncomfortable to treat others? Encourage yourself to identify your problems and create strategies for resolving them. In taking action, you’ll find your own capability and begin to let the depression go.

Fighting perfectionism:

  • make a list of pros and cons
  • ask yourself if the standard could ever be realized
  • use response-prevention technique and ride the discomfort of not checking
  • become process-oriented, which is in your control, rather than goal-oriented, which is not
  • unwillingness to make mistakes leads to lack of risk-taking; write yourself a note on the value of making mistakes
  • take ownership of your mistakes and assert your right and necessity to make them to keep growing, to yourself and to others
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The Free Capital Blog Digest

The following is a digest of posts from Guy Thomas’s Free Capital blog from Feb 2011 through Jan 2012.  Each post provides a link to the parent article with bullet-pointed lists of key-takeaways from each. For the complete discussion by the original author, please click the link to the parent article.

How important is analytical intelligence in investing?

  • Equity trading is not as reliant on raw mental strength (IQ, analytical ability) as fixed-income trading; instead, equity trading is more dependent upon mental characteristics such as:
    • Actively seeking information from dis-confirming sources
    • Adjusting for one’s biases
    • Accepting uncertainty for long periods
    • Deferring decisions for as long as possible
    • Calibrating your certainty to the weight of evidence
    • Responding unemotionally to new information
    • Indifference to group affiliation
  • The mental characteristics which are helpful in investing are not universal positives and may be useless or negative characteristics in other endeavors

Max, min and average payoffs

  • Most activities can be categorized as max payoff, min payoff or average payoff
  • Max payoff means the activity is “positive scoring”, your payoff is your highest or best result and failure carries no lasting consequences
  • Optimal traits for max payoff are:
    • high energy
    • irrational optimism
    • persistence
  • Examples of max payoff activities include:
    • selling
    • leadership
    • most sports
  • Min payoff means the activity is negative scoring, your payoff is your lowest result and even a single failure may have lasting consequences
  • Optimal traits for min payoff are:
    • meticulous care
    • good judgment
    • respecting your limitations
  • Examples of min payoff activities include:
    • flying a plane
    • driving a car
    • performing brain surgery
  • Average payoff activities combine elements of both max and min; investing is an average payoff activity, with particular emphasis on the min aspects
  • A lot of success in investing comes from simply avoiding mistakes (min payoff)

Discussion of diversification (posts 1, 2, 3 & 4)

  • Diamonds and flower bulbs
    • Diamonds are companies with exceptional economics and long-term competitive advantages that you’d be happy to hold if the stock exchange closed tomorrow for the next five years
    • Flower bulbs are companies which are cheap at the moment but which have no exceptional business qualities (they often make a good quantitative showing but not a strong qualitative one); they can usually be counted on to bloom but should be bought in modest size because they require liquidity to get back out of the position and realize the value
    • Which should you buy? Diamonds are exceptionally rare and require outstanding foresight of long-term durability; flower bulbs are more common, simpler to spot and merely require patience and a strong stomach
    • “Investing is a field where knowing your limitations is more important than stretching to surpass them”
  • How many shares should an investor hold? Some theory…
    • The optimal number of stocks to hold, N, is a function of…
      • quality of knowledge about return dispersions (decreasing)
      • $ size of portfolio (increasing)
      • volatility of shares (increasing)
      • capital gains tax rate (decreasing)
    • Exceptional investors with exceptional quality of knowledge should hold a concentrated portfolio; Buffett from 1977-2000 appears to have held approx. 1/3 of his portfolio in his best idea and changed it annually
    • With a small portfolio, liquidity is not a concern but as your portfolio scales a large number of holdings becomes optimal to maintain your liquidity which enhances your optionality by giving you the opportunity to change your mind without being trapped in a position
    • If the companies you target have highly volatile share prices, it becomes attractive to switch frequently so that you can “buy low and sell high”, thus you want to restrict your position sizing (higher number of positions) and maintain liquidity
    • If the capital gains rate is high you are penalized for turnover so you want to keep your total number of positions low and hold them for longer
  • How many shares should an investor hold? Some practicalities
    • There is clearly a trade-off between the number of positions you have and your quality of knowledge
    • A portfolio which is higher in diversification may hold many lower quality businesses (flower bulbs) but the certainty of the analysis of each might be significantly higher than a concentrated portfolio of several high quality businesses (diamonds) whose analysis is extremely sensitive to long-term forecasting accuracy
  • Concentrated investors often “come a cropper”
    • Many investors eventually disappoint because they have concentrated their bets on companies the world turns against
    • This has happened even to great investors like Warren Buffett (ex., WaPo, which now looks like a horse-and-buggy investment)
    • The danger of concentration is that nothing grows forever, and concentration + illiquidity often make it hard to escape mistakes

Meeting management

  • Opportunity cost of time: is it better spent speaking to management or investigating other ideas?
  • Getting an edge: sometimes speaking with management helps to understand the picture in a way that gives you an edge
  • Buffett: if you need to talk to management, you shouldn’t own the stock
  • Don’t be schmoozed

Analytics versus heuristics; why I don’t use DCF models

  • Time is precious and DCF models take too long
  • A good buying opportunity shouts at you from the market; if you need a calculator, let alone a spreadsheet, it’s probably too close
  • Robustness is more important than refinement; it’s easy to find apparent discrepancies in valuation, but most are false– it’s more important to seek out independent insights which confirm or deny the discrepancy than to calculate its size; when info quality is good, focus on quantifying and ranking options, but when it is poor, focus on raising it
  • Non-financial heuristics are often quicker and sufficiently accurate to lead to correct decisions; you may make more errors than the rigorous analyst but you can work much faster and evaluate many more opportunities which is usually a good trade-off

A Tale Of Two Kart Tracks

The following is a talk I gave to a retail sales team on the subject of customer service:

Today I want to share a “Tale of Two Kart Tracks” with you. The two kart tracks are “Simraceway” in Sonoma, CA at the Sonoma Raceway, and “CalSpeed Karting” in Fontana, CA, at the Fontana Auto Club Speedway. I visited Simraceway with some friends a couple weekends ago, and I visited CalSpeed last year with a group of employees across our organization.

First, let’s talk about what it was like to arrive at each facility. At Simraceway, we entered the main gate for the Sonoma Raceway and informed the gate attendant that we were here to do some gokarting. He looked at us with a puzzled expression and admitted he wasn’t sure if there was any karting going on. After going back and forth, he suggested that, if there was a place to do gokarting, it might be inside and up at the top of the hill inside the track, but he emphasized he really didn’t know what we’d find up there.

At the Fontana Speedway, the gate attendant knew exactly where the kart track was, offered us a map and explained where we were on the map and which way to go down the road to get to the kart track without getting lost.

Next, let’s talk about checking in and paying. At Simraceway, we pulled up and parked in a general parking lot and wandered around for a bit trying to figure out, due to poor signage, where we needed to go to get karting. An employee finally noticed us and asked if she could help and then pointed at a shed some ways off from where we were standing as the place to go to buy our race admission. She didn’t seem particularly busy, but she was apparently too busy to escort us. I had seen on the internet that the track was offering a buy 3, get two races free package. When I asked the employee about this, she informed me that she didn’t know about that deal because it “Wasn’t her department.” Please keep in mind that over the course of the day we saw THREE employees total at the track, so this didn’t appear to be a mega corporation. When we made it to the cashier’s booth, the employee on duty seemed frustrated to have to explain the pricing options to us. When we attempted to upsell ourselves on an icy cold beverage in the refrigerator, he seemed confused as to how to process the transaction. He didn’t seem very excited for us to be there doing business with him. Keep this young man in mind because I will say more about him in a bit.

At the Fontana Speedway, we arrived in a clearly demarked holding pen. Uniformed employees came out, greeted us and set our expectations about filling out required paperwork and waiting for the track marshals to be ready to get us for orientation. Everyone smiled and offered their help as we waited. There were about four or five employees just handling checkins for our large group.

When everything was ready and the attendees were assigned to heats w/ separate colored arm bands, we were invited in, one team at a time, to the training room to receive a welcome from the track marshals, who described the kind of karts we’d be driving, the organization of our practice, qualifying and racing sessions, safety standards of the track, flags and signalling on the track and a basic walkthrough of the best line to take on the track. Then, everyone suited up with jumpsuits, headsocks, helmets and neck braces which were in good condition and of a similar brand and style to avoid confusion.

Can you guess how this was handled at Simraceway? There was no orientation. There was no explanation of the karts, of signalling on the track nor of safety. We were shown to a small, dingy closet and left to figure out the equipment on our own. When my friend emerged with a helmet that was clearly too big for his head and shook his head back and forth to show how the helmet swiveled, the track attendant told him it “should be fine.” When I asked what the best line was on the track, the track attendant told me, “I don’t know, I am sure you’ll figure it out.”

We were led outside to our karts and the young man who first took our money. He looked sullen and pointed at the karts we should ride in which were lined up side by side in the pit. I noticed there were just enough karts for our group of 5– what if other customers arrive? I asked, looking at another set of 7 karts pulled off on the gravel. “You’ll probably be the only ones” we were told. We climbed into our karts (without any explanation of the safe way to do so, for kart and driver alike) and then, as we waited for our engines to get started, I chatted with the young man. Did he live around here? Does he like it out here? Etc. He complained, “I have to work 3 jobs right now, one of them is bartending in town. I am really tired.” I took mental note of that.

At CalSpeed, the attitude was fun, but serious. The track marshals demonstrated how to safely climb in and out of the karts. Where not to put hands and feet, at rest or in motion. What to do if they stalled out on the track. We had a group of about 45, and there were enough karts for everyone (3 heats of 15). The track marshals led the teams in the first couple laps out on the track in their own karts to demonstrate a good racing line and how to drive the track. Then we were “off to the races!”

At Simraceway, I asked if the track attendants could help us line up and do an organized start so we could race for position. Despite being their only customers, this seemed like an inconvenient request and after some badgering, the young man finally accepted that if we lined ourselves up as we came down the final straight away, he’d wave a flag to signal the race was on. It wasn’t exactly what you’d call organized, and it didn’t seem like he cared much if we had the experience we wanted. In our 5 races, he didn’t manage to start us the way I had asked even once– and in the first lap of the first race, two of our racers stalled out trying to line up for the final straightaway start.

Needless to say, our small party went off the track and into the dirt, weeds and brambles quite a bit over those 5 races. In each race we had at least one complete stall out where a driver’s kart died on the track and he had to pull off to the side and wait for someone to come out and jump it. On one occassion, that driver was me and my friends completed four or five laps before an attendant got to me, then another 3 while the attendant tried and failed to pull the jump cord (no offense to our female friends, but she just didn’t appear strong enough and somehow was surprised by this fact despite not being able to jump start anyone’s karts in the pits, either). I essentially sat on the outside of the track for half a race! When one of my friends complained about this happening to him and asked for a partial refund, the track attendant first argued and told him “Well, you only missed 5 minutes”… of a 12 minute race! And when he asked to speak to a manager, she got on her walkietalkie right in front of him and made it sound like he was asking for the world and the manager denied the request. Then, when he asked to see the manager in person, she got back on the walkie talkie and the manager could be heard saying, “Alright, just give him $10” It was ridiculous and arbitrary! During each of the 5 races, one driver had to rotate through the kart that we all agreed was slower by half than the other karts– despite my consistently turning over faster lap times in the first four races, I could not make this kart go any faster, which my friends gleefully told me was a sign of my hubris for thinking I could beat them in the “slow kart.”

How was this handled at CalSpeed? Needless to say, there were very few problems to address, because the staff was prepared and they had prepared us in return. Most problems that could’ve occurred, were avoided. And when someone’s kart did become inoperable occassionally, they were promptly moved off the track, returned to the pits and put in a new kart and sent back out into the melee. Simraceway couldn’t even do this because more than half of their karts were in disrepair!! Overall, CalSpeed was extremely accomodating of our needs and wants. We were their “only customers for the day” and they treated us like we were special and created structure and order to our race activities that really enhanced the fun. No one seemed surprised at anything.

The last thing I noticed was about how we left. I noticed a race podium near the cashier shack, but no one on duty ever offered to take our pictures there afterward to commemorate the days events at Simraceway. Instead, our final memory of the place is one of absurdity– after never receiving a safety briefing the entire time we were there, one of my friends was scolded in the pits about some hand movement he had made out on the track because, as the employee said, “Safety is our number one priority here and that just isn’t safe.” She said this as we were climbing out of our karts after the FINAL RACE OF THE DAY. Talk about bad timing!

At CalSpeed, the day was not complete before the top three finishers of each heat were stood up on the podium and cheered by the entire group. Pictures were taken and everyone chattered excitedly about all the fun they had and all the interesting things they learned about racing that day.

What lessons can be learned in comparing these two facilities?

First, let’s consider the value of preparedness. With appropriate levels of trained staff, a fleet of well-maintained karts and an organizational structure for the day, the CalSpeed group demonstrated that they were professionals who expected our business and were prepared to deliver us an excellent experience. At Simraceway, the poorly trained staff, with rundown and inoperable karts and no real racing structure or organization for their services (we were told at various points that our race sessions would be 10, 12 and 15 minutes long… they ended up being about 13 minutes) demonstrated that they were surprised to have customers and not really in a position to serve more than the 5 of us who happened to show up.

Second, let’s consider the value of consistency. From arrival and check in to departure, the smiles, attitudes and helpfulness of the CalSpeed group were consistent. It gave us the sense we working with one team, who loved their jobs and were dedicated to our enjoyment at their facility. It was, of course, just the opposite at Simraceway, where the gate attendant didn’t even know there was karting on site, the track attendants didn’t know their roles only what they weren’t responsible for (apparently, customer service…) and the fun and excitement of karting was always tempered by the disillusionment and cluelessness of the staff serving us.

Third, let’s talk about opportunity. If the people at CalSpeed are working other jobs, I didn’t hear about it. Their sole focus was on the job they had to do right then, in that moment, with us, their customers. They probably don’t have to work other jobs because CalSpeed is a successful operation that keeps them all busy. It is hard to feel sorry for the young man at Simraceway working three jobs to get by. He is standing on top of what Earl Nightengale would call a “Field of Diamonds”, he just doesn’t seem to recognize the opportunity.

In parting, I’d like to ask you to think about the following:

Of these two kart tracks, which do you think is more profitable?
Of these two kart tracks, which do you think has an easier time with marketing and generating new and referral business?
Of these two kart tracks, which do you think has higher customer satisfaction and loyalty?
Of these two kart tracks, which would you rather visit as a paying customer?
Of these two kart tracks, which would you rather work at as an employee?
Of these two kart tracks, which would you be most proud to own?

Final thought: both of these kart tracks are on the grounds of a larger race operation; both have access to the same go kart technology and safety systems; both of these kart tracks have the opportunity to charge the same amount to their customers; both of these kart tracks are in California and both of these kart tracks are selling the same service at the end of the day– the experience of racing with friends.

So what is it that makes these two kart tracks different?

In my mind, the “Tale of Two Kart Tracks” is really “The Tale of Two Attitudes Toward Customer Service.”

Video – Mohnish Pabrai On Forbes

 

Intelligent Investing with Steve Forbes presents Mohnish Pabrai, managing partner, Pabrai Funds

Major take-aways from the interview:

  • Attitude is the most important attribute of any investor
  • The value investor’s attitude advantage is the ability to wait for the right opportunity
  • “All man’s miseries stem from his inability to sit in a room alone and do nothing” channeling Pascal into an investor appropriate format: “All investment managers’ miseries stem from an inability to sit alone in a room and do nothing”
  • Ideal investment industry: gentlemen of leisure who go about their leisurely tasks and when the world is severely fearful is when they put their leisurely tasks aside and go to work
  • People think entrepreneurs take risk; in reality, they do everything they can to minimize risk– low risk, high return bets
  • Pabrai Funds has a “moat” by mirroring Buffett’s 25% performance after 6% hurdle because it aligns his interests with his clients; total fund expenses are 10-15 basis points, with Pabrai’s salary and staff paid for out of performance fees
  • Shorting makes no sense because maximum upside is a double and maximum downside is bankruptcy
  • Do not talk to company management because they are high charisma sales people and will pitch you on optimism, not realism
  • Big fan of the Checklist Manifesto, has a checklist of 80 items he looks over before making an investment
  • Pioneers are the people who get filled with arrows