What’s The Yield On Saudi Prince Alwaleed’s “Strategic” Twitter Investment?

Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal has made a $300M “strategic” investment in Twitter, according to Bloomberg.com:

Alwaleed, who leads the 2011 Arab Rich List, and his investment company agreed to buy a “strategic stake” in Twitter, Kingdom Holding said today. A strategic holding means more than 3 percent, Ahmed Halawani, a Kingdom Holding director, said in an interview. That would give the San Francisco-based company a valuation exceeding $10 billion.

Alwaleed is described by Bloomberg as a businessman and an investor. But Alwaleed is a politician, not a businessman– he is a member of the Saudi royal family, and his capital and wealth are continually generated by the Saudi royal family’s political control over Saudi oil fields. Similarly, Alwaleed is an “investor” in businesses like Citi and Twitter in the same sense that the CIA “invested” in Google and Facebook– for information and for control, not for economic or financial profit.

If this is a challenging view to accept, let’s consider just this recent purchase of his Twitter stake from insiders. According to the article, an industry research group recently cut their forecast for Twitter’s 2011 ad revenue from $150M to $139.5M. What kind of value multiplier did Alwaleed “invest” in if he paid $300M for more than 3% of the company which is now valued at over $10B?

Let’s give Alwaleed the benefit of the doubt and say that Twitter’s 2011 ad revenue comes in at $150M. Let’s further assume that Twitter is a highly profitable company and 30% of their revenues drop down to the bottom line and become net profit. That’s $45M of net profit in 2011.

At a $10B market cap, Alwaleed’s investment was made at 66.6x Price-to-Revenues and 222.2x Price-to-Earnings. I should hope I don’t need to do the math for you to show what kind of growth expectations you have to factor into those ratios for them to make sense.

Now, ask yourself, have you ever heard of the “Best Investor In the Universe”, Warren Buffett, investing in companies at these kinds of multiples? Ask yourself, what kind of margin of safety does Alwaleed have here when paying so much for so little. Ask yourself, is it a credible idea that Alwaleed is truly a successful businessman and investor who has managed to grow his personal fortune to $19.6B (according to Wikipedia) since 1979 by investing at such high multiples?

Alwaleed “is a savvy investor and the hot thing in the IT world is social networking,” said Nabil Farhat, a partner at Abu Dhabi-based Al Fajer Securities.

Historically, how do even “savvy investors” fare investing in the latest “hot thing”?

As hinted at earlier, there is a more reasonable explanation for why Alwaleed invested in Twitter, why he has invested in Citi and News Corp., and why he invests in almost anything– Alwaleed is part of a political front and he makes investments as part of a political agenda. Politics is not an economically efficient system, it cares not for scarcity and cost in the economic sense of productive effort and opportunity cost. Political systems get their revenues from coercion, and they use economic resources as but another means to their arbitrary political ends.

Why did Alwaleed invest in Twitter? Because Twitter played an embarrassing role in the recent “Arab Spring” of revolutionary fervor across the Middle East this year and Alwaleed and his sponsors want to be in a position which allows them the knowledge and influence of the insider, of control. This is what is meant by the savvy Mr. Alwaleed’s “strategic” investment in a not-so-profitable social media favorite.

Why did Alwaleed invest in Citi? Because Citi is a centerpiece to the financial chicanery involving the global drug trade controlled by the CIA, the power-politics of world political intrigue and espionage and the dangerous, corrupt game of arms dealing and the financing of imperial military adventurism.

Why did Alwaleed invest in News Corp.? To control the news!

Let us not confuse legitimate businessmen and investors with political operatives and speculators any longer!

One Consequence Of Law Divorced From Economic Scarcity: $308MM Death Sentences

This latest travesty of criminal and economic justice courtesy of The Atlantic:

Their report showed that since the current death-penalty statute was enacted in 1978, [California] taxpayers have spent more than $4 billion on only 13 executions, or roughly $308 million per execution. As of 2009, prosecuting death-penalty cases cost upwards of $184 million more each year than life-without-parole cases. Housing, health care, and legal representation for California’s current death-row population of 714—the largest in the country—account for $144 million in annual extra costs. If juries continue to send an average of 20 convicts to San Quentin’s death row each year, and executions continue at the present rate, by 2030 the ranks of the condemned will have swelled to more than 1,000, and California’s taxpayers will have spent $9 billion to execute a total of 23 inmates.

Law and the legal system is part of the economy, that is, it falls under it, not outside of it. The law is a means to a particular end (justice). It is irrational to turn the means (law) into an end itself by placing it outside the economic calculation nexus. When you do, the result is arbitration and punishment costs which far exceed any reasonable estimate of the actual damage the convicted has caused along with the potential settlement cost of future torts following a potential “vigilante” solution to the problem.

Exercises In Imagination

A friend sends along the following video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKfuS6gfxPY

Ignoring the pitch for Ron Paul’s political campaign at the end of it, that’s about as good as a libertarian video comes. The key is the identification of one moral standard for all people. It is hypocritical to expect any other person or persons to appreciate a “foreign policy” that you yourself would not appreciate if applied to you.

Here’s another good video about libertarian philosophy from Stefan Molyneux: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cd-SLRyuRq0&w=560&h=315

The reality of government financing is exploitation of its citizens. The people are not fully and fairly compensated for their labor as the exchange being made (via taxation) is not voluntary and deemed to be mutually beneficial.

I’d like to help produce more videos like these. I think YouTube is a powerful medium for spreading the message of individual liberty through the use of economies of scale.

Want To Lose Money In An Uninspired Way? Become A GM Investor

The UAW, which represents tens of thousands of GM hourly workers, has negotiated a base pay increase as well as an increased profit-sharing bonus, with the help of executive management (Bloomberg):

“When GM was struggling, our members shared in the sacrifice,” UAW Vice President Joe Ashton, who directs the union’s General Motors Department, said in a statement released last night. “Now that the company is posting profits again, our members want to share in the success.”

One Berkley “labor professor” (what the hell is that?) compared the compensation negotiations to economic stimulus:

“It’s an impressive agreement in a very tough economy,” said Shaiken, the Berkeley professor. “This agreement amounts to a stimulus package because it generates jobs and puts purchasing power into the economy.”

Question: why would anyone in their right mind want to be a GM shareholder?

Management has conspired with Marxist labor unions to increase hourly wages during a time period of general economic weakness, great challenges for the auto industry in particular and a near-death environment for GM specifically. Additionally, unionized factory employees are now being treated like they have capital-at-risk, when they do not. Factory employees don’t own or control GM capital and have nothing to do with intelligently or otherwise allocating that capital– it makes absolutely no sense that any entrepreneurial gains from the successful allocation of that capital should accrue to factory workers as some bargaining chip for securing their employment, especially when there are tens of millions of unemployed people looking for work in this country.

This is an odd inversion of the socialist principle of a divorce between costs and benefits.

To add insult to injury, the company has evidently become an auxiliary extension of the US government and its stimulus policy.

GM shareholders aren’t playing with fire, they’re standing outside the charred remains of a multistory apartment structure expecting to enjoy a high standard of living by moving in.

Gary North Says “NO!” To Hyperinflation

In case you missed his previous missive on the subject, entitled “Which Flation Will Get Us?“, Gary North came out today firmly against the idea of a hyperinflationary experience in the US or any other industrialized country with a privately owned central bank. Instead, North is predicting “mass inflation”, which he defines as 15-30% money supply growth per annum.

North bases his conclusion on four premises:

  1. The central banks control inflation, the central banks are owned by the banks, hyperinflation destroys banks who are borrowed short and lent long
  2. There is too much public awareness of the role the Fed plays in promoting inflation nowadays (primarily thanks to Ron Paul), so they will get blamed if something goes wrong
  3. People have become accustomed to the boom-bust cycle and the pattern of recessions following inflations, so the public will be more tolerant and forgiving of a recession and the “return to normalcy” than the destruction and reset of a hyperinflation
  4. Members of the Federal Reserve System participate in a lucrative employee pension system which primarily holds US stocks (53% of plan assets) and bonds (34% of plan assets), which will be made worthless by a hyperinflation, giving the employees of the Federal Reserve System a vested interest in preserving the system and averting hyperinflation

North calls hyperinflation a “policy choice”. He believes the only thing that could change this outcome would be if the Congress nationalized the Fed. Then, all bets are off.

It’s an interesting prediction. It makes a lot of sense. I am not sure how mass inflation will avoid some of the problematic items mentioned above though (particularly #2 and #4).

If North is right, this should be good for gold and not so good for people invested in stocks as consumer price increases will likely outpace increases in stock prices. Stock prices may even get hurt short-term because of increased commodity prices for many businesses.

UPDATE

Robert Wenzel of EconomicPolicyJournal.com fires back:

So don’t put me in the more unemployment camp or the mild inflation camp,or in the non-hyperinflation camp. Long term there are too many unknowns to be in any camp, especially when you have a machine known as the Fed that can shoot out billions trillions of dollars whenever it chooses. I just watch what the Fed is doing and adjust accordingly on a roughly six month basis. The constant adjustments are no way to live, but are necessary because of the fact that we do have a central bank, the Federal Reserve, that manipulates up and down the money supply. Right now, because of the new money accelerated growth that is occurring,  I anticipate that the climb in price inflation is going to escalate dramatically, where this spike in price inflation will stop, I have no idea. I just take it six months at a time.

Keeping Your Eye On The Macro Ball

Gary North’s latest piece on the EU debt debacle succinctly highlights the two extremities of inevitability with regards to the final resolution of the EU’s fiscal and monetary problems– totalitarian government control, or default:

If the sovereign government debt situation in Europe is anywhere near a final economic solution, why do the heads of Germany and France keep meeting? These meetings are getting more frequent.

Why didn’t all the previous meetings solve the economic problem of PIIGS debt?

What public relations statement do they expect will bring financial stability to the PIIGS?

What new program will they suggest, only to be disavowed as impractical by the European Central Bank, and then adopted a week or two after the official denial?

What program will they ever submit to their respective parliaments, to be debated openly in front of voters? None, you say? I see. Just like before.

What opportunity will voters in France and especially Germany be given to express their view of the new program? None, you say? I see. Just like before.

What indication will investors see that there is any new program that is not merely another Band-Aid?

What program, other than more deficit spending by France and Germany to lend more money to the PIIGS, will ever come forth from one of these meetings?

What solution, other than more purchases of the IOUs of PIIGS bonds by the ECB, will ever be presented?

What will they ever suggest, other than more of the same?

What evidence will ever be presented that the latest round of more of the same will not be followed in a few weeks and months and years by even more of the same?

As always, investors dream of a final economic solution. They keep returning, like a dog to its vomit, to the capital markets, euros in hand, to get in on the boom that lies ahead – must lie ahead – because of the final infusion of capital, the final expansion of the monetary base, the final round of more of the same.

This is a good example of a macro-factor that a good value investor would want to always keep in the back of his mind while performing his bottoms-up analysis of a given company.

Personal Dilemmas Of The Immoral Economy

The WSJ.com has just posted an article, “Buy, Sell, Fret: Retail Traders Swing Into Action“, that is ripe for commentary from the twin perspectives of value investing and Austrian economics. With any luck, we may even venture into the philosophic territory by the end of this episode. Let’s get started:

In a throwback to the day-trading era, the market’s stomach-churning gyrations are creating a new class of stock obsessives hanging on every dip and rebound.

Average investors are scrambling to stay ahead of the massive swings—often via mobile devices like iPads and smart-phones, leading to sharp spikes in trading volumes at many brokerages.

“I am distracted and frankly unnerved,” says Andy Lavin, a public-relations executive in Port Washington, N.Y., who manages about $800,000 of his own money.

Mr. Lavin says he has been checking his iPad regularly during meetings and on his way to work. On Monday, he bought $15,000 in futures on the Chicago Board Options Exchange Volatility Index. After President Barack Obama addressed the decision by Standard & Poor’s to downgrade long-term U.S. debt, Mr. Lavin dashed to monitor the market reaction.

“If you look away for a second, you lose,” Mr. Lavin says.

One of the themes I’d like to explore here is perception versus reality. For example, Mr. Lavin’s perception is that it is his inability to keep up with the markets, tick by tick, that expose him to potential ruination. The reality is that it is his decision to split his attention and capabilities between his professional job and daytrading which exposes him to ruination.

As a value investor, daytrading is obviously an intellectually bankrupt strategy detached from an understanding of fundamental reality because the economic value of companies do not change as often, rapidly or dramatically as their security prices might. So, anyone who becomes obsessive about the frequent changing of security prices without any regard to the underlying economic value of the company the securities belong to is engaging in a speculative gamble, not trying to keep up with an investment portfolio. Daytrading while at work is as absurd as playing online poker at work, or visiting a virtual blackjack table on your iPad while sitting in a meeting. The illusion (delusion?) of control is precisely the same, as is the inappropriateness of the simultaneity.

As an Austrian economist, this appears to be an outstanding example of some of the many unintended consequences of Federal Reserve monetary policies as well as federal government interventionist policies.

In terms of monetary policy, Ben Bernanke’s reckless inflationary mandate creates new malinvestment in the economy by distorting entrepreneurs’ and other economic actors’ view of the true supply of savings in the economy. Interest rates are driven down below their free market equilibrium levels providing the illusion of wealth that doesn’t actually exist. Entrepreneurs (and daytraders are entrepreneurs, though they’re a variety more ephemeral than a butterfly) usually end up in grossly speculative activities because with the new supply of money in their hands and the lowered cost of borrowing at their backs it pays to do so, or so they think.

Similarly we can see the broad effects of an interventionist, regulatory political framework. Such a superstructure creates so many obstacles and added costs for “normal” economic activity that the productively-eager are pushed into enterprises with the lowest cost of entry and the least number of hoops to jump through before one can nominally start making money. Does it get any easier than opening up an electronic brokerage account and ACHing a large deposit?

At the nexus of these two philosophies, economics and investing, we see another tragedy unfolding– where is the comparative advantage (economist) or the analytical edge (investor) in a public relations professional-turned-daytrader? Why has this man, who appears to be quite successful at his chosen career given the size of his gambling stake — I mean, accumulated personal savings — which amounts to $800,000, investing this money on his own in the financial markets?

Why isn’t he putting that $800,000 of capital to work in his own business, where he seems to be demonstrating an ability to earn outsize returns on capital? Assuming this individual is reasonable and not merely gambling, what might this say about the condition of the economy as a whole that he has not chosen this seemingly obvious alternative?

Continuing:

The high-stakes drama is also making once-calm investors jittery. Richard Chaifetz, chief executive of Chicago-based ComPsych Corp., which provides mental-health counseling for 13,000 companies, says his firm has seen a 15% increase in calls from stressed out employees who are watching the stock markets from their desks.

This is another unintended consequence of inflationary monetary policies and, as a certain French economist of the 19th century might say, “that which is unseen”.

The Federal Reserve and its army of statisticians can only (attempt to) calculate that which is priced in units of money. But that which is not priced in money (until it ends up as a psychotherapist or pharmaceutical bill, anyway) can not be calculated.

What kind of effect on national productivity must this be having with so many people so distracted and made anxious by volatility in the financial markets?

Even some 401(k) investors are getting more active. Before this week, Ryan Jones rarely monitored his investment accounts. Now the 30-year old advertising strategist checks his phone several times a day for market reports and devotes his lunch time to rejiggering his portfolio.

“I’m just a regular guy who started the month with a 401(K) balance, and am trying to make sure it’s still there next month,” he says.

I look at quotes like the one above as proof positive that the 401(K) is not as good a tax-reduced deal as it is marketed as, and especially not for all the “regular guys” trying to manage them on their own with limited allocation options, to boot.

There’s just no way for these people to manage their money intelligently in a 401(K). And yet again, it transforms every saver into a part-time stock analyst and investor. This is not where the average person’s comparative advantage is located. Seeing how widespread the 401(K)-miracle wealth thesis is, I’d even call it something of a mania. Rather than taking their savings and investing in something local, tangible and familiar, many people have learned to wish upon a stock market star, cast their savings into a 401(K) like a penny into a fountain and then attempt to patiently wait the duration of their professional career until they can all cash out easy millionaires and retire to Florida or wherever.

But for that reality to become a reality, someone has to do a lot of work in the meantime because, contrary to what people might’ve thought [amazon text=George S. Clayson was adovcating in his book&asin=1897384343], the money doesn’t multiply itself unaided. Do people really believe that they can unintelligently, haphazardly and especially as in present times, anxiously invest their money in the stock markets and thereby wind up rich by retirement?

Another confused “investor”:

Andrew Schrage, a 24-year-old website editor, shifted the allocations in his $50,000 portfolio, away from equities and further into bonds, selling some of his technology stocks on Tuesday after announcements by the Federal Reserve that the central bank planed to keep interest rates near zero.

Mr. Schrage, who lives in Chicago, says he is planning to plow the money back into stocks, but is waiting for the right opportunity.

“This volatility has forced me to adopt a day-trading mentality,” Mr. Schrage says.

Wrong. The volatility hasn’t forced you to do anything, Mr. Schrage. It is your adoption of the fallacious belief that volatility is risk that has forced you into an uncomfortable position where you suddenly find yourself daytrading to try to avoid it.

The language of this article is curious. This 24-year-old website editor has $50,000 of capital in a financial market portfolio. Does he have $50,000 of capital in his website business? It almost sounds like he is a 24-year-old financial trader, who does some website editing on the side.

I don’t mean to heap scorn on age but it is fascinating that this young man has managed, in only 24 years on this earth so far, to not only find time to educate himself on how to edit websites but also on how to watch the Fed and trade accordingly. And this is, yet again, demonstration of the principle that this activity is pseudo-economic. It is not connected to real economic activity and any derivatives thereof but rather is driven by the moves and anticipation of moves by the central bank.

This is a centrally-planned economy, with centrally-planned financial markets. The trouble for most people is that the central planning aspect is too subtle for them to notice, being obscured under numerous layers of propagandistic “this is free market capitalism” rhetoric.

Nearly finished:

Dan Nainan, a 30-year-old comedian, spent Tuesday in his New York office fixated by the market fluctuations, refreshing the screen on his online brokerage account every couple of minutes throughout the day. About a half-hour before the close of trading, Mr. Nanian sold $120,000 worth of his Apple stock. “I felt a tremendous sense of relief,” he says, “and I’m not buying again.”

In a choppy market like this one, a single lunch meeting or conference call that results in missed trading opportunities can translate into thousands of dollars in losses. Andrew Clark, a 30-year old, real-estate consultant in Birmingham, Ala., sold about half of his Apple Inc. stock on Monday morning after it opened 3.2% down. During a client meeting, he missed a brief rally when the stock went up 1.7%.

“I would have bought those back at that point,” Mr. Clark says. “If you aren’t glued to these movements, you miss so much.”

What other times and places have seen 30-year-old comedians with $120,000+ stock portfolios? These are interesting and unusual times.

Andrew Clark’s comment is instructive because he believes he knows what he has missed when he really hasn’t got a clue. He’s missed Ben Graham. He’s missed out on observing the impact of frequent trading commissions on his bottom line. He’s missed out on the fact that his whole investment strategy revolves, admittedly, around the sure-fire failure of selling low and buying high.

Millions of people like this are born in every generation. They have no way to learn their lessons except by experience. Even then, if their experiences aren’t severe and near-death enough, they’re prone to forget them. They drift idly around during their blissfully ignorant existences like gnats above the highway. If the macroeconomic conditions are just right and they’re presented with the opportunity, they’ll launch themselves straight into the windshield of a market panic and spend the rest of the cruise down the motorway of life wondering how they got there and bemoaning the loss of their more innocent days.

These are people who would probably do just fine managing their personal affairs in more humble, honest economic settings. That’s part of the true villainy of the Bernanke-ite economy, to tempt all these people with fleeting prosperity at the risk of utter ruin, and to do it all at the point of a gun.

After all, who would play these games and take this farcical economic structure seriously if they were free to leave at any time without threat of going to jail, or worse?

Here we arrive at the moral, and the conclusion.